Of Little Comfort: "war Widows, Fallen Soldiers, And The Remaking Of The Nation After The Great War" by Erika KuhlmanOf Little Comfort: "war Widows, Fallen Soldiers, And The Remaking Of The Nation After The Great War" by Erika Kuhlman

Of Little Comfort: "war Widows, Fallen Soldiers, And The Remaking Of The Nation After The Great War"

byErika Kuhlman

Hardcover | March 19, 2012

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During and especially after World War I, the millions of black-clad widows on the streets of Europe’s cities were a constant reminder that war caused carnage on a vast scale. But widows were far more than just a reminder of the war’s fallen soldiers; they were literal and figurative actresses in how nations crafted their identities in the interwar era. In this extremely original study, Erika Kuhlman compares the ways in which German and American widows experienced their postwar status, and how that played into the cultures of mourning in their two nations: one defeated, the other victorious. Each nation used widows and war dead as symbols to either uphold their victory or disengage from their defeat, but Kuhlman, parsing both German and U.S. primary sources, compares widows’ lived experiences to public memory. For some widows, government compensation in the form of military-style awards sufficed. For others, their own deprivations, combined with those suffered by widows living in other nations, became the touchstone of a transnational awareness of the absurdity of war and the need to prevent it.
Title:Of Little Comfort: "war Widows, Fallen Soldiers, And The Remaking Of The Nation After The Great War"Format:HardcoverDimensions:235 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:March 19, 2012Publisher:NYU PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0814748392

ISBN - 13:9780814748398

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Editorial Reviews

"Kuhlman uses letters, diaries, popular magazine articles, and correspondence between widows and their governments in the United States and Germany to examine the ways war widows coped with their roles after World War I... The book takes a deep look at the opinions of widows themselves, through their own words, and puts those experiences and struggles into the context of national efforts to define the war for both vanquished and victorious countries, such as using ceremonial mourning for soldiers and the plight of war widows to reinforce their national identity."-Washington State Magazine,