Of Spirit: Heidegger and the Question by Jacques DerridaOf Spirit: Heidegger and the Question by Jacques Derrida

Of Spirit: Heidegger and the Question

byJacques Derrida

Paperback | April 9, 1991

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"I shall speak of ghost, of flame, and of ashes." These are the first words of Jacques Derrida's lecture on Heidegger. It is again a question of Nazism—of what remains to be thought through of Nazism in general and of Heidegger's Nazism in particular. It is also "politics of spirit" which at the time people thought—they still want to today—to oppose to the inhuman.

"Derrida's ruminations should intrigue anyone interested in Post-Structuralism. . . . . This study of Heidegger is a fine example of how Derrida can make readers of philosophical texts notice difficult problems in almost imperceptible details of those texts."—David Hoy, London Review of Books

"Will a more important book on Heidegger appear in our time? No, not unless Derrida continues to think and write in his spirit. . . . Let there be no mistake: this is not merely a brilliant book on Heidegger, it is thinking in the grand style."—David Farrell Krell, Research in Phenomenology

"The analysis of Heidegger is brilliant, provocative, elusive."—Peter C. Hodgson, Religious Studies Review
Title:Of Spirit: Heidegger and the QuestionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:148 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.6 inPublished:April 9, 1991Publisher:University of Chicago Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0226143198

ISBN - 13:9780226143194

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Table of Contents

TRANSLATORS' NOTES
CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
NOTES

From Our Editors

'Derrida's ruminations should intrigue anyone interested in Post-Structuralism. . . This study of Heidegger is a fine example of how Derrida can make readers of philosophical texts notice difficult problems in almost imperceptible details of those texts.'