Oil in the Twenty-First Century: Issues, Challenges, and Opportunities

Hardcover | August 6, 2006

EditorRobert Mabro

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Oil is hitting the headlines once again. The big increases in oil prices over the past two years are upsetting consumers and puzzling producers. The reasons are difficult to understand, since few people are familiar with the complex workings of the price regime for oil in international trade.It is said that sluggish investment is a major cause, but what are the reasons for inadequate investment in oil producing and refining plants during the last 20 years? Does oil have a future? We are told that oil production will soon peak because the rate of production is higher than replacement rates. Climate change problems are casting a shadow over the future of fossil fuels. There may, however, be a solution to the nefarious CO2 emissions in, for instance,technologies that sequestrate carbon. Oil's stronghold is the transport sector: cars, trucks, railway engines, planes, ships. The demand for oil would suffer a fatal blow if technical innovations in car engines make it possible to use an alternative fuel to petrol or diesel. New energy sources -wind, solar, tide, waves, geo-thermal - are both renewable and environment-friendly. Do they represent a threat to the future of oil? An international team of experts addresses these highly topical questions in this comprehensive volume.

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Oil is hitting the headlines once again. The big increases in oil prices over the past two years are upsetting consumers and puzzling producers. The reasons are difficult to understand, since few people are familiar with the complex workings of the price regime for oil in international trade.It is said that sluggish investment is a maj...

Robert Mabro, CBE is a Fellow of St Antony's College, Oxford. In 1976 with Aubrey Jones, PC he founded the Oxford Energy Policy Club which meets twice a year; in 1978 he founded and became the first Director of the Oxford Energy Seminar, held every year in Oxford. He then established the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, an educat...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:368 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.09 inPublished:August 6, 2006Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199207380

ISBN - 13:9780199207381

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Table of Contents

Sheikh Ahmad Fahad Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah, President of the OPEC Conference, Minister of Energy of the State of Kuwait, and Chairman, Kuwait Petroleum Corporation: Foreword1. Robert Mabro, Fellow of St Antony's College, Oxford: Introduction2. Adnan Shihab-Eldin, Director of Research, OPEC Secretariat and Acting Secretary General, 2005: The Outlook for Oil to 20203. Bassam Fattouh, Reader in Finance and Management, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London: The Origins and Evolution of the Current International Oil Pricing System: A Critical Assessment4. Bassam Fattouh and Robert Mabro: The Investment Challenge5. Thomas S. Ahlbrandt, World Energy Project Chief, U. S. Geological Survey: Global Petroleum Reserves, Resources, and Forecasts6. Andrew Gould, Chairman and CEO, Schlumberger Ltd: Technologies to Extend Oil Production7. Benito Muller, Senior Research Fellow, Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, and Managing Director of Oxford Climate Policy: Some Aspects of the Climate Change Issue8. Karl S. Lackner, Ewing-Worzel Professor of Geophysics, Columbia University, New York: Carbon Sequestration9. Olivier Appert, President of Institut Francais du Petrole, and Philippe Pinchon, Director, Moteur Energie, Institut Francais du Petrole: The Future Technical Development of Automotive Powertrains10. Robert Mabro: Renewable Energy