Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief, and a Native Culture in Motion by Michael D. Mcnally

Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief, and a Native Culture in Motion

byMichael D. Mcnally

Hardcover | July 15, 2000

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The Ojibwe or Anishinaabe are a native American people of the northern Great Lakes region. 19th-century missionaries promoted the singing of evangelical hymns translated into the Ojibwe language as a tool for rooting out their "indianness," but the Ojibwe have ritualized the singing to makethe hymns their own. In this book, McNally relates the history and current practice of Ojibwe hymn singing to explore the broader cultural processes that place ritual resources at the center of so many native struggles to negotiate the confines of colonialism.

About The Author

Michael McNally is at Eastern Michigan University.

Details & Specs

Title:Ojibwe Singers: Hymns, Grief, and a Native Culture in MotionFormat:HardcoverPublished:July 15, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195134648

ISBN - 13:9780195134643

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"Contains both scholarly rigor and passionate empathy. McNally's analysis of native texts and his unique fieldwork afford solid contributions that will extend the edges of developing scholarship."--Anglican and Episcopal History