On Nationality by David MillerOn Nationality by David Miller

On Nationality

byDavid Miller

Paperback | October 1, 1997

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Nationalism is a dominating force in contemporary politics, but political philosophers have been markedly reluctant to discuss, let alone endorse, nationalist ideas. David Miller here defends the principle of nationality. He argues that national identities are valid sources of personal identity; that we are justified in recognizing special obligations to our co-nationals; that nations have good grounds for wanting to be politically self-determining; but thatrecognizing the claims of nationality does not entail suppressing other sources of personal identity, such as ethnicity. Finally, he considers the claim that national identities are dissolving in the late twentieth century. This timely and provocative study offers the most compelling defence to date of nationality from a radical perspective.
David Miller is at Nuffield College, Oxford.
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Title:On NationalityFormat:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.55 inPublished:October 1, 1997Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198293569

ISBN - 13:9780198293569

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction2. National Identity3. The Ethics of Nationality4. National Self-Determination5. Nationality and Cultural Pluralism6. Nationality in Decline?7. Conclusion

From Our Editors

Sociologist David Miller defends the principle of nationality, arguing that national identities are valid sources of personal identity but that recognizing the claims of nationality does not entail suppressing other sources of personal identity, such as ethnicity. This timely and provocative book offers the most compelling defense to date of nationality from a radical perspective

Editorial Reviews

`a forcible philosophical analysis of the concept of nationality and the ethical problems it unleashes'The Sunday Times