On The Adaptation Of External Nature To The Physical Condition Of Man; Principally With Reference…

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byJohn Kidd

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1833 edition. Excerpt: ...respect to his habitation, there is scarcely a part of the structure itself, or of the furniture contained in it, which is not held together, to a greater or less extent, by means of the same metal: and many articles are either entirely of iron, or of iron partially and superficially coated with tin. Zinc, and copper, and antimony, and lead, and tin, are component parts of his pewter and brazen utensils. Quicksilver is a main ingredient in the metallic coating of his humble mirror: cobalt and platina, and metals perhaps more rare and costly than these, as chrome, are employed in the glazing of his drinking cups and jugs. And if he be the possessor of a fowling-piece, which commonly he would be, arsenic must be added to the foregoing list, as an ingredient in the shot with which he charges it; for it is arsenic which enables the shot, during the process of its granulation, to acquire that delicately spherical form by which it is characterised. So that the whole number of metals made use of by society at large for common purposes, amounting to less than twenty, more than half of these are either directly used by the mere peasant, or enter into the composition of the furniture and implements employed by him. In estimating the value of those mineral substances which were considered in the preceding chapter, as applicable to the common purposes of life, their degree of hardness is the property of principal consideration: but, in addition to this, metallic bodies possess some peculiar properties which very greatly increase their value. Thus, under a force acting perpendicularly on their surface, as under repeated blows of the hammer, or compression by rollers, many of them are capable of being expanded to a greater or less extent; some of them...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1833 edition. Excerpt: ...respect to his habitation, there is scarcely a part of the structure itself, or of the furniture contained in i...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:90 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.19 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217521193

ISBN - 13:9780217521192

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