On The Beauties, Harmonies, And Sublimities Of Nature (volume 4); With Occasional Remarks On The…

Paperback | February 6, 2012

byCharles Bucke

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823. Excerpt: ... there not a power, which can change an acorn into oak? a caterpillar into a butterfly? and an animal into dust?--If there exist a power, capable of effecting these and similar changes, it can, assuredly, with as little difficulty as any of the minor operations of chemistry, reconvert that dust into an essence, which we, in utter ignorance of its nature, designate spirit. We know nothing, by ocular demonstration, of the soul's flight. Neither do we know the uses or the means, employed by Nature, in many of her operations. We do not know the uses of the nipple of a man; we are at a loss for the uses of the zebra and the camelopard; of the hunch of the dromedary; and of the enormous excrescencies of the hornbill and the toucan 5--we are ignorant of the uses of zircon and glucine, two of the simple earths;--we are ignorant of the process by which the diamond is chrystallized; and we are equally ignorant of the end, for which insects undergo their respective changes. Yet we know, that all these things are. Let the good man, then, calculate on the power and justice of the Eternal; who, in time most fitting for the purpose, will not only elicit the soul from the body; but convert its present anxious condition into a sabbath of eternal rest. To feel thus is to feel assured of immortality;--the best consolation of the wretched, and the best hope for the unrestrained majesty of a rich and magnificent mind. To feel thus is comparatively to be advanced a thousand steps towards perfection; and as this feeling is almost as innate, in our vocabulary of enjoyments, as those arising from love, and all the more estimable passions and affections, virtue becomes more agreeable to us; the past more capable of understanding; the present more endurable; and the future more preg...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823. Excerpt: ... there not a power, which can change an acorn into oak? a caterpillar into a butterfly? and an animal into dust?--If there exis...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:92 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.19 inPublished:February 6, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217265499

ISBN - 13:9780217265492

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