On the philosophy of temperance, and the physical causes of moral sadness

Paperback | February 8, 2012

byWilliam Moore Wooler

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1840 Excerpt: ... NOTES. Notes A.--Page 10. (a) A lady, in company with the memorable Mr. Grimshaw, was admiring a man of talents: "Madam," says he, "I am glad you never saw the Devil." "Why," continued Mr. Grimshaw, "he has greater talents than all the ministers in the world. I am fearful, if you were to see him, you would fall in love with him, as you seem to regard talents without sanctity." Do not therefore be led away by the sound of talents." "Talk not of talents;--what hast thou to do? Thy duty, be thy portion five or two; Talk not of talents;--is thy duty done? Thou hadst sufficient, were they ten or one. Lord, what Mr talents are I cannot tell, Till thou shalt give me grace to use them well: That grace impart, the bliss will then be mine, But all the power, and all the glory thine." Montgomery. "Occupy till I come." Luke xix. 13. Note B.--Page 11. (b) Some nations are unimproveable, or are content with a certain modicum of knowledge, which for ages they have neither enlarged nor diminished. The Chinese are a remarkable people for such passive quiescence, and infancy of knowledge. It has been justly observed, that they seem to be M satisfied to lay out their intellects at simple interest, and have been content to live upon the annual income, without ever dreaming that capital and product might he immensely increased, by being invested in the commerce of minds--the commerce, of all others, the most infallibly lucrative, and in which the principles of free trade are cardinal virtues. The motions of the Mass in England, I fear are more circular than progressive,--gin-horse like, ever coming to the same point. Our motto, in the cultivation of our minds, ought ever to be, "Onwards." Seeing we are civilized Englishmen, let us not be naked savages in our talk! Note C--Page ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1840 Excerpt: ... NOTES. Notes A.--Page 10. (a) A lady, in company with the memorable Mr. Grimshaw, was admiring a man of talents: "Madam," says h...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:26 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.05 inPublished:February 8, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217267173

ISBN - 13:9780217267175

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