On Time, Punctuality, and Discipline in Early Modern Calvinism by Max EngammareOn Time, Punctuality, and Discipline in Early Modern Calvinism by Max Engammare

On Time, Punctuality, and Discipline in Early Modern Calvinism

byMax EngammareTranslated byKarin Maag

Hardcover | November 23, 2009

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In On Time, Punctuality, and Discipline in Early Modern Calvinism, Max Engammare explores how the sixteenth-century Protestant reformers of Geneva, France, London, and Bern internalized a new concept of time. Applying a moral and spiritual code to the course of the day, they regulated their relationship with time, which was, in essence, a new relationship with God. As Calvin constantly reminded his followers, God watches his faithful every minute. Come Judgment Day, the faithful in turn will have to account for each minute. Engammare argues that the inhabitants of Calvin's Geneva invented the new habit of being on time, a practice unknown in Antiquity. It was also fundamentally different from notions of time in the monastic world of the medieval period and unknown to contemporaries such as Erasmus, Vives, the early Jesuits, Rabelais, Ronsard, or Montaigne. Engammare shows that punctuality did not proceed from technical innovation. Rather, punctuality was above all a spiritual, social, and disciplinary virtue.
Title:On Time, Punctuality, and Discipline in Early Modern CalvinismFormat:HardcoverDimensions:286 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.87 inPublished:November 23, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521769973

ISBN - 13:9780521769976

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Table of Contents

1. John Calvin's personal time-management; 2. Church time and its civic setting; 3. Saving time and learning to be punctual; 4. The growth and decline of Huguenot calendars (mid-sixteenth to late-seventeenth centuries); 5. Ronsard and Tyard versus Viret regarding time; 6. The daily pattern; Conclusion.