One Soldier's War by Arkady BabchenkoOne Soldier's War by Arkady Babchenko

One Soldier's War

byArkady BabchenkoTranslated byNick Allen

Paperback | February 3, 2009

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One Soldier's War is a visceral and unflinching memoir of a young Russian soldier's experience in the Chechen wars that brilliantly captures the fear, drudgery, chaos, and brutality of modern combat. An excerpt of the book was hailed by Tibor Fisher in theGuardian as 'right up there withCatch-22 and Michael Herr'sDispatches,' and the book won Russia's inaugural Debut Prize, which recognizes authors who write 'despite, not because of, their life circumstances.' In 1995, Arkady Babchenko was an eighteen-year-old law student in Moscow when he was drafted into the Russian army and sent to Chechnya. It was the beginning of a torturous journey from naive conscript to hardened soldier that took Babchenko from the front lines of the first Chechen War in 1995 to the second in 1999. He fought in major cities and tiny hamlets, from the bombed-out streets of Grozny to anonymous mountain villages. Babchenko takes the raw and mundane realities of war-the constant cold, hunger, exhaustion, filth, and terror-and twists it into compelling, haunting, and eerily elegant prose. Acclaimed by reviewers around the world, this is a devastating first-person account of war by an extraordinary storyteller. One Soldier's War is a visceral and unflinching memoir of a young Russian soldier's experience in the Chechen wars that brilliantly captures the fear, drudgery, chaos, and brutality of modern combat. An excerpt of the book was hailed by Tibor Fisher in theGuardian as 'right up there withCatch-22 and Michael Herr'sDispatches,' and the book won Russia's inaugural Debut Prize, which recognizes authors who write 'despite, not because of, their life circumstances.' In 1995, Arkady Babchenko was an eighteen-year-old law student in Moscow when he was drafted into the Russian army and sent to Chechnya. It was the beginning of a torturous journey from naive conscript to hardened soldier that took Babchenko from the front lines of the first Chechen War in 1995 to the second in 1999. He fought in major cities and tiny hamlets, from the bombed-out streets of Grozny to anonymous mountain villages. Babchenko takes the raw and mundane realities of war-the constant cold, hunger, exhaustion, filth, and terror-and twists it into compelling, haunting, and eerily elegant prose. Acclaimed by reviewers around the world, this is a devastating first-person account of war by an extraordinary storyteller.
Title:One Soldier's WarFormat:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 1.09 inPublished:February 3, 2009Publisher:Grove/AtlanticLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0802144039

ISBN - 13:9780802144034

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Better than 'Dispatches' I enjoy anything written about the Chechen wars, but this in an A-grade first-hand account. Highly recommended in trying to understand the Chechen struggle from a grunt perspective.
Date published: 2018-05-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good book Hard to tell how much of this is "truth" but its certainly the authors perception of what happened and I think thats the point. To show what a soldier percieves. Very interesting read on a soldiers life in russia. I know some of this is true from friends who have explained the russian military system.
Date published: 2013-06-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Haunting! Reading about Babchenko's experience in the Russian military will haunt me forever. This book shows how war can eat away at your humanity if you're not careful. It also touches on the brutal after-effects of combat: an addiction to your own adrenaline. I can't believe the Russian military can still carry on with their inhumane initiation tactics, and was surprised that someone has not exposed this before.
Date published: 2010-09-21