One Who Almost Made It Back: The Remarkable Story of World War Two's Unsung Heroes, 'Teddy' Blenkinsop, DFC, CdeG (Belge), RCAF by Peter CellisOne Who Almost Made It Back: The Remarkable Story of World War Two's Unsung Heroes, 'Teddy' Blenkinsop, DFC, CdeG (Belge), RCAF by Peter Cellis

One Who Almost Made It Back: The Remarkable Story of World War Two's Unsung Heroes, 'Teddy…

byPeter Cellis

Hardcover | September 20, 2008

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On the night of 27/28 April 1944, Teddy and his crew were acting as deputy master bombers during a Pathfinder raid on Montzen in Belgium. After a successful attack, their Lancaster was shot down. Miraculously he survived to be protected by Belgian citizens before ending his days in Bergen Belsen concentration camp. Little was known of his exploits in between, until Peter Celis, a Belgian air force officer, began to research the story. What he uncovered is far more amazing than any fictional film could be.
He found that Blenkinsop was not only an exceptional and gallant pilot, but that his loyalty, dedication and devotion were second to none and that his bravery and fearlessness led him to make the supreme sacrifice in the face of Nazi Germany.
Written with pace and insight, this is an uplifting account of an outstanding Canadian young man who very nearly made it back home.
Title:One Who Almost Made It Back: The Remarkable Story of World War Two's Unsung Heroes, 'Teddy…Format:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:September 20, 2008Publisher:Grub StreetLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1906502161

ISBN - 13:9781906502164

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Should be mandatory reading for all Canadian High School Students This is an exceptional book that, IMHO, should be required reading for Grade 12 high school students in this country. There are three reasons why I say this: 1. Teddy’s brief, intense and ultimately tragic life is a highly instructive story of character in the crucible – not only his, but his family, his crew, his Belgian and French protectors and his Belgian and German tormentors. It is also a story of a very important part of world history – played out around the world, involving different nations and peoples and could be the introduction to history, geography, culture and human psychology for many young Canadians. 2. Author Peter Celis’s research is painstaking in its depth, breadth and ultimately in his prose. It is all the more remarkable that he is not a trained historian per se, although I am sure he would be accepted as one based on his work. Also remarkable is the fact that as a young Belgian he would take notice of such a seemingly obscure fact (a tombstone) and finding the large story behind that all too ubiquitous artifact of war that haunts the European landscape. Peter Celis is actually a Belgian Air Force F-16 pilot - which should offer students a dual incentive - follow your passion and don't be afraid to go outside your (trained) comfort zone. 3. The remarkable, felicitous confluence of (1) and (2) . Accident and opportunity are often not far removed. (The flip side of this is that the difference in circumstances between a seeming non-event and a catastrophe is often marginal.) Being aware of the vicissitudes of life – and death – can make us a little more sensitive to the plight of others. (e.g. “But for the grace of God go I”) and a little more humble, which itself is a prerequisite to learning. These tertiary concepts deserve to be appreciated, almost as much as the first and second aforementioned events.
Date published: 2013-05-19