Optical Imaging of Cancer: Clinical Applications by Eben Rosenthal

Optical Imaging of Cancer: Clinical Applications

EditorEben Rosenthal, Kurt R. Zinn

Hardcover | October 13, 2009

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To describe principles of optical imaging including chemistry and physics of fluorescence, limitations/advantages of optical imaging compared to metabolic and anatomic imaging.Describe hardware adapted for small animal imaging and for clinical applications: endoscopes and operative microscopes.Outline FDA approved and newer optical imaging probes. Include discussion of chemistry and linkage to other proteins. Review current techniques to image cancer and the development of techniques to specifically image cancer cells.Review use of exploiting differences in tissue autofluorescence to diagnose and treat cancer. Include agents such as 5-aminoleculinic acid.Review mechanisms that require proteolytic processing within the tumor to become active fluorophores.Review use of cancer selective proteins to localize probes to cancer cells: include toxins, antibodies, and minibodies.Introduction of plasmids, viruses or other genetic material may be used to express fluorescent agents in vivo. This chapter will review multiple vectors and delivery mechanisms of optical imaging cassettes.Preclinical investigations into the use of optical contrast agents for the detection of primary tumors in conventional and orthotopic models will be discussed.Preclinical investigations into the use of optical contrast agents for the detection of metastatic tumors in mouse models will be discussed.Use of targeted and non-specific optical contrast agents have been used for the detection of sentinel lymph node detection. These applications and how they differ from other applications will be discussed.Because of the unique difficulty of identifying tumor from normal tissue in brain tissue, a separate chapter would be needed. More clinical data is available for this cancer type than any other.Discussion of potential clinical applications for optical imaging and an assessment of the potential market.

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Title:Optical Imaging of Cancer: Clinical ApplicationsFormat:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9.25 × 6.1 × 0 inPublished:October 13, 2009Publisher:Springer New YorkLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0387938737

ISBN - 13:9780387938738

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Table of Contents

Part I: Optical Imaging PrinciplesBasic principles Kurt Zinn, University of Alabama at BirminghamDescribe principles of optical imaging including chemistry and physics of fluorescence, limitations/advantages of optical imaging compared to metabolic and anatomic imaging.Hardware for imaging John Frangioni, Harvard UniversityDescribe hardware adapted for small animal imaging and for clinical applications: endoscopes and operative microscopes.Optical probes GE HealthcareOutline FDA approved and newer optical imaging probes. Include discussion of chemistry and linkage to other proteins. Part II: Cancer Targeting Strategies Introduction to molecular targeting strategies KE Adams, Baylor UniversityReview current techniques to image cancer and the development of techniques to specifically image cancer cells.Tissue auto fluorescence CF Poh, Vancouver, CanadaReview use of exploiting differences in tissue autofluorescence to diagnose and treat cancer. Include agents such as 5-aminoleculinic acid.Proteolytic mechanisms O. McIntyre, Vanderbilt UniversityReview mechanisms that require proteolytic processing within the tumor to become active fluorophores.Antigen targeting M Garfinkle, Texas A&M UniversityReview use of cancer selective proteins to localize probes to cancer cells: include toxins, antibodies, and minibodies.Genetically engineered optical imaging TBAIntroduction of plasmids, viruses or other genetic material may be used to express fluorescent agents in vivo. This chapter will review multiple vectors and delivery mechanisms of optical imaging cassettes.Part III: Potential Clinical ApplicationsPreclinical investigations: Detection of primary tumors Eben Rosenthal, UABPreclinical investigations: Detection of metastatic cancer Y Hama, NIH/NCI Preclinical investigations into the use of optical contrast agents for the detection of metastatic tumors in mouse models will be discussed.Sentinel lymph node imaging P Wunderbaldinger, University of ViennaUse of targeted and non-specific optical contrast agents have been used for the detection of sentinel lymph node detection. These applications and how they differ from other applications will be discussedNeuro-oncologic applications Veiseh M, University of SeattleBecause of the unique difficulty of identifying tumor from normal tissue in brain tissue, a separate chapter would be needed. More clinical data is available for this cancer type than any other.Future Directions for Clinical Use of Optical Imaging TBADiscussion of potential clinical applications for optical imaging and an assessment of the potential market.