Origins of the Federal Judiciary: Essays on the Judiciary Act of 1789 by Maeva MarcusOrigins of the Federal Judiciary: Essays on the Judiciary Act of 1789 by Maeva Marcus

Origins of the Federal Judiciary: Essays on the Judiciary Act of 1789

EditorMaeva Marcus

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

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The Judiciary Act of 1789 established a federal court system, an experiment that became one of the outstanding features of American democracy. Yet little has been written about the origins of the Act. This volume of essays analyzes the Act from political and legal perspectives while enhancingour understanding of the history of the judiciary and its role in the constitutional interpretation.
Maeva Marcus is a Director, Documentary History Project, Supreme Court of the United States.
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Title:Origins of the Federal Judiciary: Essays on the Judiciary Act of 1789Format:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 8.54 × 5.87 × 1.18 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195067215

ISBN - 13:9780195067217

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From Our Editors

The Judiciary Act of 1789 established a federal court system, an experiment that became one of the outstanding features of American democracy. This volume of essays analyzes the Act from political and legal perspectives while enhancing our understanding of the history of the judiciary and its role in constitutional interpretation. Using previously unavailable material, the first essays examine the importance of political considerations and the intended implementations of constitutional imperatives. They also focus on such topics as ambiguities in the Judiciary Act's division of jurisdiction between state courts and the newly created federal system; early interpretations of various sections of the Act; whether the Act presupposed a federal common law; the problem of dual office holdings by judges; and early perceptions of justice in the courts of frontier America. The book concludes with an essay exploring the attitudes of the Framers towards judicial independence. This interdisciplinary look at one of the most important statues enacted by Congress will interest no

Editorial Reviews

"The quality of the essays is uniformly high....A few more sorties like this and we will be well on the way to recapturing a better understanding of the beginnings of the sulfurous mix of law, politis, and morality in whih we still find ourselves."--William and Mary Quarterly