Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Europe by Lucian N. LeusteanOrthodox Christianity and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Europe by Lucian N. Leustean

Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Europe

EditorLucian N. Leustean

Hardcover | July 2, 2014

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Nation-building processes in the Orthodox commonwealth brought together political institutions and religious communities in their shared aims of achieving national sovereignty. Chronicling how the churches of Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, and Serbia acquired independence from the Patriarchate of Constantinople in the wake of the Ottoman Empire's decline, Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Europe examines the role of Orthodox churches in the construction of national identities.

Drawing on archival material available after the fall of communism in southeastern Europe and Russia, as well as material published in Greek, Serbian, Bulgarian, Romanian, and Russian, Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Europe analyzes the challenges posed by nationalism to the Ecumenical Patriarchate and the ways in which Orthodox churches engaged in the nationalist ideology.

Lucian N. Leustean is Senior Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
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Title:Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Southeastern EuropeFormat:HardcoverDimensions:288 pagesPublished:July 2, 2014Publisher:Fordham University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0823256065

ISBN - 13:9780823256068

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Editorial Reviews

In the great family of Christian denominations, few are more mysterious to the western mind than Orthodoxy. Its liturgies are deemed exotic, its theology dimly understood, and its ecclesiastical organisation the subject of befuddled conjecture [...] there can be no hesitation in recommending this volume to as wide an audience as possible; scholars of modern European Christianity in particular will find much that is useful in its pages. It is only to be hoped that the book will encourage further scholarship in this vein.