Ottoman Lyric Poetry: An Anthology by Walter G. AndrewsOttoman Lyric Poetry: An Anthology by Walter G. Andrews

Ottoman Lyric Poetry: An Anthology

EditorWalter G. Andrews, Najaat Black, Mehmet Kalpakli

Paperback | April 18, 2006

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The Ottoman Empire was one of the most significant forces in world history and yet little attention is paid to its rich cultural life. For the people of the Ottoman Empire, lyrical poetry was the most prized literary activity. People from all walks of life aspired to be poets. Ottoman poetry was highly complex and sophisticated and was used to express all manner of things, from feelings of love to a plea for employment.

This collection offers free verse translations of 75 lyric poems from the mid-fourteenth to the early twentieth centuries, along with the Ottoman Turkish texts and, new to this expanded edition, photographs of printed, lithographed, and hand-written Ottoman script versions of several of the texts--a bonus for those studying Ottoman Turkish. Biographies of the poets and background information on Ottoman history and literature complete the volume.

Walter G. Andrews holds a research professorship in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization at the University of Washington. Najaat Black is a poet and fiction writer. Mehmet Kalpakli is assistant professor of Ottoman culture and literature at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey.
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Title:Ottoman Lyric Poetry: An AnthologyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:392 pages, 8.95 × 5.95 × 0.87 inPublished:April 18, 2006Publisher:UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON PRESSLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:029598595X

ISBN - 13:9780295985954

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Table of Contents

Preface to the 2006 Expanded Edition Acknowledgments Poet?s Preface A Note on the Pronunciation and Transcription of Turkish

Ottoman Lyrics: Introductory EssayThe Gathering of Desire

Nesimi1. Oh my idol

Ahmed-I Dai2. The torture of the beloved

Sheyhi3. Your sun-face 4. It?s the season of spring

Ahmet Pasha5. Ask about my wailingThe Mejlis: Gathering of Desire 6. Is there any heart

Nejati7. Those glances rain down arrows 8. The heart is pleased 9. Those tulip-cheeked ones 10. Spiraling, the sparks Iskender/Alexander, Hizir, and the Fountain of Eternal Life

Mihri Hatun11. I opened my eyes 12. At times, my longing 13. My heart burns

Zeynep Hatun14. Remove your veil

Revani15. What do you say

Lamii16. Yesterday I saw

Zati17. Oh heavens, why do you cryThe Pleasantries of Zati

Hayreti18. We are not the slaves of Suleyman

Figani19. My sad heart is burnt black The Cosmos and the Earth 20. Your kiss does not satisfy

Fevri21. The arrow of your glance

Hayali22. They do not know how to search 23. We are among those 24. When dawn hennas her hands The Story of Leyla and Mejnun

Fuzuli25. Oh God, don?t let anyone 26. If my heart were a wild bird 27. For long years 28. The pointed reproach of the enemy Husrev, Shirin, and Ferhad

Nisayi29. We are the Mejnun Fabulous Birds

Nevi30. We don?t need the cup of pleasure 31. Help me, oh sapling

Baki32. That tyrant 33. Oh beloved, since the origin 34. The fountain of my spirit 35. If only the bud would open 36. Sparks from my heart 37. Your rebellious glance

Yahya Bey38. Come wander through the city 39. Poetry holds the written veil

Ruhi40. Curse the thorns of fate

Sheyhulislam Yahya41. Saki, offer the cup 42. Let the hypocrites 43. Is there no heartThe Down on Your Cheek

Nefi44. That black drunken eye 45. Those who painted my portrait 46. The heart is both the cup and the wine

Sheyhulislam Bahayi47. Oh cry, what are you doing

Nabi48. When we watch the spinning of the sky 49. In the garden of time and destiny 50. At the gathering of joy Rumi?s Mirror

Naili51. We are the snake 52. My tears became desire 53. Since the thunderbolt of disaster 54. What witch are you Poetic Parallels

Neshati55. We are desire 56. You?re gone ? I?m alone 57. The sky?s face has turned dark

Nedim58. At the gathering of desire 59.When the east wind 60. As the morning wind blows 61. Take yourself to the rose-garden 62. Delicacy was drawn out

Koja Ragib Pasha63. Dark thought is revealed

Rasih Bey64. Don?t lower your languid eyes

Fitnat Hanim65. In a heart

Esrar Dede66. In the ruins 67. You left, but don?t forget The Indian Style

Sheyh Galib68. You are my effendi 69.I won?t abandon you 70. To me, love is the flame

Sunbulzade Vehbi71. Oh east wind, come

Enderunlu Vasif72. The gazelles have bound their hearts

Izzet Molla73. Everyone knows 74. I am a nightingale

Yenishehirli Avni75. Don?t think we came to ask

Notes The Poets Ottoman Turkish Texts Ottoman Script Texts

Editorial Reviews

The Ottoman Empire was one of the most significant forces in world history and yet little attention is paid to its rich cultural life. For the people of the Ottoman Empire, lyrical poetry was the most prized literary activity. People from all walks of life aspired to be poets. Ottoman poetry was highly complex and sophisticated and was used to express all manner of things, from feelings of love to a plea for employment.This collection offers free verse translations of 75 lyric poems from the mid-fourteenth to the early twentieth centuries, along with the Ottoman Turkish texts and, new to this expanded edition, photographs of printed, lithographed, and hand-written Ottoman script versions of several of the texts--a bonus for those studying Ottoman Turkish. Biographies of the poets and background information on Ottoman history and literature complete the volume.This is the finest literary translation of Ottoman Turkish lyrics ever done and will shape the reception of the poetry from now on. The selection is excellent?-aesthetically superior, historically representative, and stylistically coherent. - Victoria Holbrook, Ohio State University