Our Faithfulness to the Past: The Ethics and Politics of Memory

Paperback | July 9, 2014

bySue Campbell

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This volume brings together essays - three of them previously unpublished - on the epistemology, ethics, and politics of memory by the late feminist philosopher Sue Campbell. The essays in Part I diagnose contemporary skepticism about personal memory, and develop an account of good rememberingthat is better suited to contemporary (reconstructive) theories of memory. Campbell argues that being faithful to the past requires both accuracy and integrity, and is both an epistemic and an ethical achievement. The essays in Part II focus on the activities and practices through which we exploreand negotiate the shared significance of our different recollections of the past, and the importance of sharing memory for constituting our identities. Views about self, identity, relation, and responsibility (all influenced by traditions in feminist philosophy) are examined through the lens ofCampbell's relational conception of memory. She argues that remaining faithful to our past sometimes requires us to re-negotiate the boundaries between ourselves and the collectives to which we belong. In Part III, Campbell uses her relational theory of memory to address the challenges of sharingmemory and renewing selves in contexts that are fractured by moral and political difference, especially those arising from a history of injustice and oppression. She engages in detail Canada's Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission, where survivor memories have the potentialto illuminate the significance of the past for a shared future. The study of memory brings together philosophers, psychologists, historians, anthropologists, legal theorists, and political theorists and activists. Sue Campbell demonstrates a singular ability to put these many different areas of scholarship and activism into fruitful conversation with each otherwhile also adding an original and powerful voice to the discussion.

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This volume brings together essays - three of them previously unpublished - on the epistemology, ethics, and politics of memory by the late feminist philosopher Sue Campbell. The essays in Part I diagnose contemporary skepticism about personal memory, and develop an account of good rememberingthat is better suited to contemporary (reco...

Canadian philosopher Sue Campbell (1956-2011) did important and influential work in moral and political psychology and in feminist theory. Her interest was in the diverse ways we express emotion and memory and in the political contexts that affect our possibilities for self-expression. Her second book Relational Remembering: Rethinkin...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.68 inPublished:July 9, 2014Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199376948

ISBN - 13:9780199376940

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Table of Contents

PrefaceEditors' IntroductionNote on SourcesAuthor's Introduction: The Second Voice: A ManifestoPart I. Our Faithfulness to the Past1. Models of Minds and Memory Activities2. Our Faithfulness to the Past: Reconstructing Memory Values3. Memory, Truth, and the Search for IntegrityPart II. Memory, Diversity and Solidarity4. Inside the Frame of the Past: Memory, Diversity, and Solidarity5. Memory, Reparation, and Relation: Starting in the Right Places6. Remembering Who We Are: Responsibility and Resistant IdentificationPart III. Remembering for the Future7. Remembering for the Future: Memory as a Lens on the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission8. Challenges to Memory in Political Contexts: Recognizing Disrespectful Challenge