Our National Drink Bill As It Affects The Nation's Well-being; A Series Of Letters To The "times" And Other Newspapers Together With Original Articles by William HoyleOur National Drink Bill As It Affects The Nation's Well-being; A Series Of Letters To The "times" And Other Newspapers Together With Original Articles by William Hoyle

Our National Drink Bill As It Affects The Nation's Well-being; A Series Of Letters To The "times…

byWilliam Hoyle

Paperback | February 7, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1884 Excerpt: ... The following letter was suggested by the reading of the City Article in the "Times." It will sufficiently explain itself: NATIONAL SOBRIETY AND THE REVENUE. To the Editor of the " Times." S1r,--May I be permitted to crave a brief space in the "Times" to lay before your readers a few thoughts and comments suggested by the perusal of two articles in your issue of this day's date. I refer, first, to the commercial leader in your City column, and, secondly, to the leader upon the letter of Sir W. Lawson, which is also in your issue of to-day. In the former article, alluding to the revenue returns, you observe: "The revenue is not improving as rapidly as could be wished, partly it would seem, because the habits of the people with reference to the consumption of intoxicating liquors have changed for the better to a certain extent. Serious as this alteration may be for the revenue, it is probable that the nation will reap the benefit of it in other ways." In the same article from which this quotation is taken there are two very pertinent illustrations of the truth of the observations just quoted. You first refer in general terms to various indications of trade improvement, and you then give some specific facts touching the cotton trade, which I will quote. You remark: "The home consumption of cotton shows an almost equally remarkable increase. During the half-year the quantity taken weekly by spinners was about 68.000' bales, against 58,000 bales per week during the corresponding period last year. This great increase in the rate of consumption is all the more noteworthy, inasmuch as the shipments of piece goods to foreign countries were 222,914,000 yards, or 9 per cent., less during the six months ended June 30, 1882, than in the corresponding period of 1881, sho...
Title:Our National Drink Bill As It Affects The Nation's Well-being; A Series Of Letters To The "times…Format:PaperbackDimensions:52 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.11 inPublished:February 7, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217526519

ISBN - 13:9780217526517

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