Out Of Darkness: The Story of Louis Braille by Russell FreedmanOut Of Darkness: The Story of Louis Braille by Russell Freedman

Out Of Darkness: The Story of Louis Braille

byRussell FreedmanIllustratorKate Kiesler

Paperback | March 19, 2004

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A biography of the modest Frenchman who, after being blinded at the age of three, went on to develop a system of raised dots on paper that enabled blind people to read and write.
RUSSELL FREEDMAN received the Newbery Medal for Lincoln: A Photobiography. He is also the recipient of three Newbery Honors, a National Humanities Medal, the Sibert Medal, the Orbis Pictus Award, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, and was selected to give the 2006 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. Mr. Freedman lives in New York C...
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Title:Out Of Darkness: The Story of Louis BrailleFormat:PaperbackDimensions:96 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.26 inPublished:March 19, 2004Publisher:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0395968887

ISBN - 13:9780395968888

Appropriate for ages: 10

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Out of the Darkness: The Story of Louis Braille Out of the Darkness captured me. It was the story of Louis Braille. He was a blind boy that believed he could make a difference for blind people. It was a captivating story of a boy who believed in his dreams. Louis Braille created a system that is the most popular writing system for the blind. Braille. He created a system, then he believed it could be improved to be better. He just kept on trying and trying to make it better. It took him three years and he did it. But it took him even longer to get somebody to believe in him too. I loved the book because it held me interested. I think it is well written and good for Grades 3-6.
Date published: 2001-03-13

From Our Editors

A biography of the nineteenth-century Frenchman who, having been blinded himself at the age of three, went on to develop a system of raised dots on paper that enabled blind people to read and write.

Editorial Reviews

An extremely well-written and informative book that tells about Braille's life and the development of his alphabet system for the blind. . . . An entertaining and fascinating look at a remarkable man." School Library Journal, Starred "