Out to Work: A History of Wage-Earning Women in the United States

Paperback | January 15, 2003

byAlice Kessler-Harris

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First published in 1982, this pioneering work traces the transformation of "women's work" into wage labor in the United States, identifying the social, economic, and ideological forces that have shaped our expectations of what women do. Basing her observations upon the personal experience ofindividual American women set against the backdrop of American society, Alice Kessler-Harris examines the effects of class, ethnic and racial patterns, changing perceptions of wage work for women, and the relationship between wage-earning and family roles. In the 20th Anniversary Edition of thislandmark book, the author has updated the original and written a new Afterword.

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First published in 1982, this pioneering work traces the transformation of "women's work" into wage labor in the United States, identifying the social, economic, and ideological forces that have shaped our expectations of what women do. Basing her observations upon the personal experience ofindividual American women set against the bac...

Alice Kessler-Harris is the R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History at Columbia University, where she also teaches in the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. She is the author of A Woman's Wage, Women Have Always Worked and In Pursuit of Equity.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:432 pages, 5.31 × 7.91 × 0.91 inPublished:January 15, 2003Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195157095

ISBN - 13:9780195157093

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"Without a doubt the single best survey of transformation of women's paid and unpaid work from the colonial period to the present."--American Historical Review