Oxford and Her Colleges, A View from the Radcliffe Library [Illustrated] by Goldwin Smith

Oxford and Her Colleges, A View from the Radcliffe Library [Illustrated]

byGoldwin Smith

Kobo ebook | January 2, 2013

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This edition features
• illustrations
• a linked Index

Excerpt:
Oxford is a federation of Colleges. It had been strictly so for two centuries, and every student had been required to[Pg 7] be a member of a College when, in 1856, non-collegiate students, of whom there are now a good many, were admitted. The University is the federal government. The Chancellor, its nominal head, is a non-resident grandee, usually a political leader whom the University delights to honour and whose protection it desires. Only on great state occasions does he appear in his gown richly embroidered with gold. The acting chief is the Vice-Chancellor, one of the heads of Colleges, who marches with the Bedel carrying the mace before him, and has been sometimes taken by strangers for the attendant of the Bedel. With him are the two Proctors, denoted by their velvet sleeves, named[Pg 8] by the Colleges in turn, the guardians of University discipline. The University Legislature consists of three houses,—an elective Council, made up equally of heads of Colleges, professors, and Masters of Arts; the Congregation of residents, mostly teachers of the University or Colleges; and the Convocation, which consists of all Masters of Arts, resident or non-resident, if they are present to vote. Congregation numbers four hundred, Convocation nearly six thousand. Legislation is initiated by the Council, and has to make its way through Convocation and Congregation, with some chance of being wrecked between the academical Congregation, which is progressive, and the rural[Pg 9] Convocation, which is conservative. The University regulates the general studies, holds all the examinations, except that at entrance, which is held by the Colleges, confers all the degrees and honours, and furnishes the police of the academical city. Its professors form the general and superior staff of teachers.

About the Author
"Goldwin Smith (1823 – 1910) was a British-Canadian historian and journalist." -- WikipediaThis edition features
• illustrations
• a linked Index

Excerpt:
Oxford is a federation of Colleges. It had been strictly so for two centuries, and every student had been required to[Pg 7] be a member of a College when, in 1856, non-collegiate students, of whom there are now a good many, were admitted. The University is the federal government. The Chancellor, its nominal head, is a non-resident grandee, usually a political leader whom the University delights to honour and whose protection it desires. Only on great state occasions does he appear in his gown richly embroidered with gold. The acting chief is the Vice-Chancellor, one of the heads of Colleges, who marches with the Bedel carrying the mace before him, and has been sometimes taken by strangers for the attendant of the Bedel. With him are the two Proctors, denoted by their velvet sleeves, named[Pg 8] by the Colleges in turn, the guardians of University discipline. The University Legislature consists of three houses,—an elective Council, made up equally of heads of Colleges, professors, and Masters of Arts; the Congregation of residents, mostly teachers of the University or Colleges; and the Convocation, which consists of all Masters of Arts, resident or non-resident, if they are present to vote. Congregation numbers four hundred, Convocation nearly six thousand. Legislation is initiated by the Council, and has to make its way through Convocation and Congregation, with some chance of being wrecked between the academical Congregation, which is progressive, and the rural[Pg 9] Convocation, which is conservative. The University regulates the general studies, holds all the examinations, except that at entrance, which is held by the Colleges, confers all the degrees and honours, and furnishes the police of the academical city. Its professors form the general and superior staff of teachers.

About the Author
"Goldwin Smith (1823 – 1910) was a British-Canadian historian and journalist." -- Wikipedia

Title:Oxford and Her Colleges, A View from the Radcliffe Library [Illustrated]Format:Kobo ebookPublished:January 2, 2013Publisher:VolumesOfValueLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN:9990005680356

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