Oxford Anthology Of The Brazilian Short Story

Paperback | May 15, 2007

EditorK. David Jackson

not yet rated|write a review
The Oxford Anthology of the Brazilian Short Story contains a selection of short stories by the best-known authors in Brazilian literature from the late nineteenth century to the present. With few exceptions, these stories have appeared in English translation, although widely separated in timeand often published in obscure journals. Here they are united in a coherent edition representing Brazil's modern, vibrant literature and culture. J.M. Machado de Assis, who first perfected the genre, wrote at least sixty stories considered to be masterpieces of world literature. Ten of his storiesare included here, and are accompanied by strong and diverse representations of the contemporary story in Brazil, featuring nine stories by Clarice Lispector and seven by Joao Guimaraes Rosa. The remaining 34 authors include Mario de Andrade, Graciliano Ramos, Osman Lins, Dalton Trevisan, and othermajor names whose stories in translation exhibit profound artistry. The anthology is divided into four major periods, "Tropical Belle-Epoque," "Modernism," "Modernism at Mid-Century," and "Contemporary Views." There is a general introduction to Brazilian literary culture and introductions to each of the four sections, with descriptions of the authors and a generalbibliography on Brazil and Brazilian literature in English. It includes stories of innovation (Mario de Andrade), psychological suspense (Graciliano Ramos), satire and perversion (Dalton Trevisan), altered realities and perceptions (Murilo Rubiao), repression and sexuality (Hilda Hilst, AutranDourado), myth (Nelida Pinon), urban life (Lygia Fagundes Telles, Rubem Fonescal), the oral tale (Jorge Amado, Rachel de Queiroz) and other overarching themes and issues of Brazilian culture. The anthology concludes with a haunting story set in the opera theater in Manaus by one of Brazil's mostrecently successful writers, Milton Hatoum.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$67.50

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

The Oxford Anthology of the Brazilian Short Story contains a selection of short stories by the best-known authors in Brazilian literature from the late nineteenth century to the present. With few exceptions, these stories have appeared in English translation, although widely separated in timeand often published in obscure journals. Her...

K. David Jackson is Professor of Portuguese at Yale University.

other books by K. David Jackson

Classical Electrodynamics
Classical Electrodynamics

Hardcover|Aug 10 1998

$121.76 online$133.95list price(save 9%)
Red Book 2015: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases
Red Book 2015: Report of the Committee on Infectious Di...

Kobo ebook|May 1 2015

$158.39 online$205.60list price(save 22%)
see all books by K. David Jackson
Format:PaperbackDimensions:542 pages, 6.1 × 9.09 × 1.3 inPublished:May 15, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195309642

ISBN - 13:9780195309645

Customer Reviews of Oxford Anthology Of The Brazilian Short Story

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION: World World Vast World of the Brazilian Short StoryPART ITropical Belle Epoque (1880s-1921)ASSIS, JOAQUIM MARIA MACHADO DE (1839-1908): Wedding SongThe Siamese AcademiesThe Fortune TellerLifeThe NurseThe Secret HeartA Woman's ArmsDona PaulaFather versus MotherWallow, Swine!VERISSIMO, JOSE (1857-1916): Going after RubberReturning from Rubber GatheringMELLO, EMILIA MONCORVA BANDEIRA DE: (PSEUD. CARMEN DOLORES) (1852-1910): Aunt Zeze's TearsBARRETO, PAULO (PSEUD. JOAO DO RIO) (1881-1921): The Baby in Rose TarlatanAn Episode in a HotelLIMA BARRETO, AFFONSO H. DE (1881-1922): The Man Who Knew JavanesLOBATO, MONTEIRO (1882-1948): The Funnyman Who RepentedPART IIModernisn (1922-1945)ANDRADE, MARIO DE (1893-1945): It Can Hurt PlentyThe Christmas TurkeyMACHADO, ANIBAL (1895-1964): The Death of the Standard-BearerThe First CorpseMACHAD0, ANTONIA DE ALCANTARA (1901-1935): The Beauty ContestGaetaninhoALPHONSUS, JOAO (1901-1935): SardanapaloACCIOLY, BRENO (1922-1966): Joao UrsoRAMOS, GRACILIANO (1892-1953): The ThiefWhaleAMADO, JORGE (1912-2000): How Porciuncula the Mulatto Got the Corpse off His BackQUIEROZ, RACHEL DE (1910-2003): Metonymy, or The Husband's RevengeREBELO, MARQUES (1907-1973): Down Our StreetVerissimo, Erico (1905-1975): FandangoThe GuerillaThe House of the Melancholy AngelPART IIIModernism at Mid-CenturyLISPECTOR, CLARICE (1920-1977): The BuffaloThe ChickenThe Smallest Woman in the WorldThe Breaking of the BreadThe Fifth StoryMiss AlgraveThe BodyPlaza MauaBeauty and the Beast, or The Wound Too GreatGUIMARAES ROSA, JOAO (1908-1967): The Girl From BeyondMuch AdoSoroco, His Mother, His DaughterThe Third Bank of the RiverTreetopsThose LopesThe JaguarLINS, OSMAN (1924-1978): Baroque Tale or Tripartite UnityEaster SundayTREVISAN, DALTON (B. 1925): The Corpse in the ParlorThe Vampire of CuritibaGOMES, PAULO EMILIO SALLES (1916-1977): Her Times TwoANDRADE, CARLOS DRUMMOND DE (1902-1987): Miguel's TheftPART IVContemporary Visions (after 1980)PINON, NELIDA (B. 1936): Big-Bellied CowBrief FlowerTELLES, LYGIA FAGUNDES (B. 1923): Just a SaxaphoneRUBIAO, MURILO (1916-1981): Zacarias, the PyrotechnistVEIGA, J.J (1915-1999): The Misplaced MachineSCLIAR, MOACYR (B. 1937): The CowThe Last Poor ManDOURADO, AUTRAN (B. 1926): Bald IslandLessa, Origenes (1903-1986): Marta: A Souvenir of New YorkFONSECA, RUBEM (B. 1925): Large IntestineCONY, CARLOS HEITOR (B. 1926): Order of the DayRAWET, SAMUEL (1929-1984): The ProphetHILST, HILDA (1930-2004): AgdaGIUDICE, VICTOR (1934-1997): The File CabinetSTEEN, EDLA VAN (B. 1936): Caril head Lina heartABREU, CAIO FERNANDO (1948-1996): Dragons...HATOUM, MILTON (B. 1952): The Truth Is a Seven-Headed AnimalSELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHYACKNOWLEDGEMENTSINDEX

Editorial Reviews

"A reader looking for a concise introduction to Brazilian literature will find it in this remarkable assemblage of texts, while those well acquainted with the tradition will find works that would be very difficult, or even impossible, to access otherwise. Jackson writes with rigour andclarity, and the links he establishes between the diverse texts, writers and periods constitute an excellent brief course on the development and significance of Brazilian literature." --Paulo de Medeiros, University of Utrecht