Panama Canal Tolls; The Traditional Policy Of The United States In Relation To Waterways. Speech In…

Paperback | February 4, 2012

byTheodore Elijah Burton

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914. Excerpt: ... tection. In view of these interests and after having invited capital and enterprise from other countries to aid in the opening of these great highways of nations under pledges of free transit to all desiring it, it can not be permitted that these Governments should exercise over them an arbitrary, and unlimited control or close them or embarrass them without reference to the wants of commerce or of the intercourse of the world. Equally disastrous would it be to leave (hem at the mercy of every nation which in lime of war might find it advantageous for hostile purposes to take possession of them and either restrain their use or suspend it altogether. The President hopes, by the general consent of the maritime powers, all such difficulties may be prevented and the interoceanic lines, with the harbors of immediate approach to them, may be secured beyond interruption to the great purposes for which they were established. In 1802 there was a disturbance upon the Isthmus of Panama which we were called upon to pacify. The note of Mr. Seward, then Secretary of State under President Lincoln, to Mr. Adams is particularly significant, because by the treaty of 1840-184S with New Granada wa had absolutely equal privileges with that country in traffic across the Isthmus. Further, an obligation rested upon us by the same treaty, article 35, to maintain order there, yet Mr. Seward claimed no special privileges for the United States. In his note to Mr. Adams, our minister to London, he said, in speaking of the disturbances which had occurred: This Government has no interest in the matter different from that of other maritime powers. It is willing to interpose its aid in execution of its treaty and further equal benefit of all nations. And again, during the term of Preside...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914. Excerpt: ... tection. In view of these interests and after having invited capital and enterprise from other countries to aid in the opening...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:18 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.04 inPublished:February 4, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217303161

ISBN - 13:9780217303163

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