Parrotfish

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Parrotfish

by Ellen Wittlinger

Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers | January 4, 2011 | Trade Paperback

Parrotfish is rated 4 out of 5 by 1.
Angela Katz-McNair has never felt quite right as a girl, but it's a shock to everyone when she cuts her hair short, buys some men's clothes, and announces she'd like to be called by a new name, Grady. Although Grady is happy about his decision to finally be true to himself, everybody else is having trouble processing the news. Grady's parents act hurt; his sister is mortified; and his best friend, Eve, won't acknowledge his existence. On top of that, there are more practical concerns--for instance, which locker room is he supposed to use for gym class? Grady didn't expect his family and friends to be happy about his decision, but he also didn't expect kids at school to be downright nasty about it. But as the victim of some cruel jokes, Grady also finds unexpected allies, including the school geek Sebastian, and Kita Charles, who's a gorgeous senior. In a voice tinged with humor and sadness, Ellen Wittlinger explores Grady's struggles--struggles any teen will be able to relate to.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 1 in

Published: January 4, 2011

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1442406216

ISBN - 13: 9781442406216

Appropriate for ages: 12

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from A brilliant contemporary for teens A compelling tale of a a boy just trying to be himself. Funny, intelligent and just the right amount of insightful. An enjoyable novel that rejoices the differences that makes us unique.
Date published: 2012-08-14

– More About This Product –

Parrotfish

Parrotfish

by Ellen Wittlinger

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 304 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 1 in

Published: January 4, 2011

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1442406216

ISBN - 13: 9781442406216

About the Book

Angela Katz-McNair has never felt quite right as a girl, but it's a shock to everyone when she cuts her hair short, buys some men's clothes, and announces she'd like to be called by a new name, Grady. Although Grady is happy about his decision to finally be true to himself, everybody else is having trouble processing the news. Grady's parents act hurt; his sister is mortified; and his best friend, Eve, won't acknowledge his existence. On top of that, there are more practical concerns--for instance, which locker room is he supposed to use for gym class? Grady didn't expect his family and friends to be happy about his decision, but he also didn't expect kids at school to be downright nasty about it. But as the victim of some cruel jokes, Grady also finds unexpected allies, including the school geek Sebastian, and Kita Charles, who's a gorgeous senior. In a voice tinged with humor and sadness, Ellen Wittlinger explores Grady's struggles--struggles any teen will be able to relate to.

Read from the Book

Parrotfish     Chapter One I could hear Mom on the phone in the kitchen gleefully shrieking to her younger sister, my aunt Gail. I was in the garage, as always on the day after Thanksgiving, dragging out carton after carton of Christmas crap, helping Dad turn our house into a local tourist attraction and us, once again, into the laughingstock of Buxton, Massachusetts. Dad handed me down another box from the highest shelf. “Sounds like Gail had the baby,” he said. “You guys finally got a cousin.” “A little late for me to enjoy,” I said. “I’m sure she’ll let you babysit sometime,” Dad said, grinning. He knows how I feel about that job. But then his eyes met mine and his smile faded a little, as if he’d just remembered something important. No doubt he had. I was separating forty strands of lights into two piles—white and multicolored—when Mom came flying through the screen door, her eyes all watery and glistening. “It’s a boy!” she said. “A healthy baby boy!” I dropped the lights I was holding and glared at her. Goddamn it, hadn’t she learned anything from me? “Healthy,” Dad said quickly. “That’s the main thing.” Thank you, Dad. At least he was making an effort to understand. “Of course it is,” Mom said, trying clumsily to plaster over her mistake. “That’s what I said. A healthy boy.” A chill ran down my back, and I turned away from them, imagining in my head the conversation between Mom and Aunt Gail. I do that sometimes to keep my mind off reality.          GAIL: Oh Judy, I’m
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From the Publisher

Angela Katz-McNair has never felt quite right as a girl, but it's a shock to everyone when she cuts her hair short, buys some men's clothes, and announces she'd like to be called by a new name, Grady. Although Grady is happy about his decision to finally be true to himself, everybody else is having trouble processing the news. Grady's parents act hurt; his sister is mortified; and his best friend, Eve, won't acknowledge his existence. On top of that, there are more practical concerns--for instance, which locker room is he supposed to use for gym class? Grady didn't expect his family and friends to be happy about his decision, but he also didn't expect kids at school to be downright nasty about it. But as the victim of some cruel jokes, Grady also finds unexpected allies, including the school geek Sebastian, and Kita Charles, who's a gorgeous senior. In a voice tinged with humor and sadness, Ellen Wittlinger explores Grady's struggles--struggles any teen will be able to relate to.

Editorial Reviews

“The author demonstrates well the complexity faced by transgendered people and makes the teen’s frustration with having to “fit into a category” fully apparent.”—Publishers Weekly

Appropriate for ages: 12