Passwords by Jean BaudrillardPasswords by Jean Baudrillard

Passwords

byJean Baudrillard

Paperback | January 10, 2011

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In his analysis of the deep social trends rooted in production, consumption, and the symbolic, Jean Baudrillard touches the very heart of the concerns of the generation currently rebelling against the framework of the consumer society. With the ever-greater mediatization of society, Baudrillard argues that we are witnessing the virtualization of our world, a disappearance of reality itself, and perhaps the impossibility of any exchange at all. This disenchanted perspective has become the rallying point for all those who reject the traditional sociological and philosophical paradigms of our age.

Passwords offers us twelve accessible and enjoyable entry points into Baudrillard’s thought by way of the concepts he uses throughout his work: the object, seduction, value, impossible exchange, the obscene, the virtual, symbolic exchange, the transparency of evil, the perfect crime, destiny, duality, and thought.
Jean Baudrillard (1929–2007) began teaching sociology at the Université de Paris-X in 1966. He retired from academia in 1987 to write books and travel until his death in 2007. His many works include Simulations and Simulacra, America, The Perfect Crime, The System of Objects, Passwords, The Transparency of Evil, The Spirit of Terrorism...
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Title:PasswordsFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:112 pages, 8 × 5.2 × 0.2 inShipping dimensions:8 × 5.2 × 0.2 inPublished:January 10, 2011Publisher:Verso BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1844676765

ISBN - 13:9781844676767

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“First prize for cerebral cold-bloodedness goes to French philosopher Jean Baudrillard.”—The New York Times

“Provocative ... he brings a reading of signs and symbols most will find interesting.”—Toronto Globe and Mail