Paths Toward Utopia: Graphic Explorations of Everyday Anarchism by Cindy MilsteinPaths Toward Utopia: Graphic Explorations of Everyday Anarchism by Cindy Milstein

Paths Toward Utopia: Graphic Explorations of Everyday Anarchism

byCindy MilsteinIntroduction byJosh MacpheeIllustratorErik Ruin

Paperback | October 5, 2012

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Consisting of 10 collaborative picture-essays that weave poetic words with intricate yet bold images, this collection aims to challenge readers into thinking of community action in a positive light. Depicting what it would be like to live, every day, in a world created from below, where coercion and hierarchy are largely vestiges of the past, Paths Toward Utopia suggests some of the practices that prefigure the self-organization that would be commonplace in an egalitarian society. This stirring book ultimately mines what people do in their daily lives for the already-existent gems of a freer future—premised on anarchistic ethics like cooperation and direct democracy.

Cindy Milstein is the author of Anarchism and Its Aspirations and has contributed essays to the anthologies Globalize Liberation and Realizing the Impossible. She is a board member of the Institute for Anarchist Studies. She lives in San Francisco. Josh MacPhee is an activist, an artist, and the author of Celebrate People’s History! an...
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Title:Paths Toward Utopia: Graphic Explorations of Everyday AnarchismFormat:PaperbackDimensions:120 pages, 8 × 6 × 0.4 inPublished:October 5, 2012Publisher:PM PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1604865024

ISBN - 13:9781604865028

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"This fine collection of graphic essays indicts a contemporary failure of imagination, and restores utopian politics that does not surrender to the drumbeat of everyday emergencies, tasks, and defeats."  —Andrej Grubacic, author, Wobblies and Zapatistas