Patrons, Clients, and Empire: Chieftaincy and Over-rule in Asia, Africa, and the Pacific

Hardcover | July 8, 2003

byColin Newbury

not yet rated|write a review
Patrons, Clients, and Empire challenges the stereotypes of despotic imperial power in Asian, African, and Pacific colonies by analysing the relationship between rulers and rulers on both sides of the imperial equation. It seeks an answer to the question: how were European officials able togovern so many societies for so long? Rejecting the usual explanations of 'collaboration' and indirect rule', this study looks to pre-imperial structures in the indigenous hierarchies which supplied patrimonial models of chieftaincy for territorial government. For nawabs, chiefs, emirs, sultans,and their officials and followers there were dynastic and economic advantages in accepting the terms of European over-rule, as well as the threat of deposition. For European officials, few in numbers and with limited military and financial resources, there were ready-made systems of localgovernment that could be co-opted, reformed, or left relatively untouched. Both sides played politics as patrons and clients within a dual system of administration based on a mixture of force and self-interest.Surveying a wide variety of cases and employing a patron-client model, this study embraces pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial politics in new states. It covers the chronology of early European dependency on local rulers; the reasons for reversal of status among chiefs and administrators; thelonger period of political bargaining over access to local resources in terms of land, labour, and taxes; and the ultimate fate of indigenous rulers in the period of party politics leading to independence.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$253.42 online
$352.50 list price (save 28%)
Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Patrons, Clients, and Empire challenges the stereotypes of despotic imperial power in Asian, African, and Pacific colonies by analysing the relationship between rulers and rulers on both sides of the imperial equation. It seeks an answer to the question: how were European officials able togovern so many societies for so long? Rejectin...

Colin Newbury is an Emeritus Fellow, Linacre College, Oxford.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:344 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.95 inPublished:July 8, 2003Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199257817

ISBN - 13:9780199257812

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Patrons, Clients, and Empire: Chieftaincy and Over-rule in Asia, Africa, and the Pacific

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

IntroductionPart I. Indian States1. Trade and Dependency2. Reversal of Status3. Clients and Brokers4. Rulers and RajSummaryPart II. North Africa5. Egypt and Sudan6. MoroccoSummaryPart III. Sub-Saharan Africa7. Western Africa8. East-Central Africa9. Southern AfricaSummaryPart IV. Maritime South-East Asia10. MalayaSummaryPart V. Pacific Islands11. Hawaii12. Fiji13. TongaSummaryConclusionList of Sources UsedIndex

Editorial Reviews

.,."a creative, perceptive, comparative study...which is careful to explicate the complexities in each colony and to project comparisons among the colonies...deserves the consideration of all scholars of colonialism. History: Reviews of New Books