Patrons, Curators, Inventors and Thieves: The Storytelling Contest of the Cultural Industries in…

Hardcover | September 17, 2014

byJonathan Wheeldon

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This book is a rare and unusually reflective insider account of the transformational challenges of the cultural industries over the past 15 years. Opening with a fresh new perspective on music industry history, it explores how the industrial world evolves more by narrative plausibility than by strategic precision, recognizing that corporate identity, purpose and power can be both reinforced and subverted by modifications to various cultural master-plots and their traditional heroes and villains.

Of most interest are the insights into the strategic struggles faced by corporate managers and by intellectual property policymakers dealing with the seismic new millennium shifts in technology, communications and related social behaviour. Illustrating how a satisfactory 'postprivate' master-narrative of social equality in the digital age has yet to emerge, the book also helps to loosen the industrial-political deadlock in the debate over copyright reform. It is essential reading for anyone who takes an interest in the changing processes of creation, dissemination and industrialization of knowledge and culture.

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This book is a rare and unusually reflective insider account of the transformational challenges of the cultural industries over the past 15 years. Opening with a fresh new perspective on music industry history, it explores how the industrial world evolves more by narrative plausibility than by strategic precision, recognizing that corp...

Jonathan Wheeldon is a Chartered Accountant and Visiting Fellow at Henley Business School. He spent ten years at Universal Music in senior positions in New York, Madrid, Los Angeles and London. He has served as Group Finance Director of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Really Useful Group where he financed the $70 million Oscar-nominated movie T...
Format:HardcoverDimensions:280 pages, 8.8 × 5.51 × 0.9 inPublished:September 17, 2014Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230249434

ISBN - 13:9780230249431

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction
PART I: MY VERSION OF EVENTS
1. A Personal Perspective
2. Innovation or Bust – a Short History of Recorded Music
PART II: STAKEHOLDER VOICES
3. Value Shift
4. Custodial Tensions
5. Hindsight
PART III: A STORYTELLING CONTEST
6. The Analysis of Discourse
7. Strategy as Storytelling
8. Identification of Key Constructs
9. A Narrative World
10. The Inventor's Tale
11. Power and Ideology
PART IV: THE PIRATE'S TALE: REFORM OF COPYRIGHT AND THE FUTURE
12. Pirates, Property and Privatization
13. Enclosing the Commons of the Mind
14. The 300 Year War of Copyright
15. My Version of Events: the Future
Bibliography
Notes


Editorial Reviews

'A superb book. This is one of the best analytical accounts by an insider of the cultural industries. Actually no: one of the best analytical accounts by ANYONE of the cultural industries.' - David Hesmondhalgh, Professor of Media and Music Industries, Institute of Communications Studies, University of Leeds 'For anyone on the front line of the on-going debates around copyright this hugely insightful book is an essential guide. It is at once a memoir showing how we got here, an atlas showing us where we are, and a lexicon telling us what our words and discourse really mean.' - Richard Mollet, Chief Executive, the Publishers Association, and former Director of Public Affairs, the BPI 'In this important and beautifully written book, an industry insider brings experience and research to bear on understanding corporations in the age of digitization. Wheeldon's understanding is itself cultural, and his lessons have wide application for how we manage and consume cultural products in future.' - Martin Parker, Professor of Culture and Organization, School of Management, University of Leicester