Pauperism; Its Causes And Remedies

Paperback | May 20, 2012

byHenry Fawcett

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1871 Excerpt: ... loss, instead of being 2s. 6d. a week, is is. a week; still this represents an income tax of nearly 7 per cent., and is a very onerous burden upon one so poor. Although it may seem to be a paradox, yet a satisfactory answer to the objection just suggested is obtained by considering how extreme is the poverty of such a labourer as the one here described. Whatever happens, it is impossible for him to be worse off than he is at the present time; his wages are not sufficient to give him an adequate supply of many of the first necessaries of life; the remuneration he receives is not determined by the state of the general labour-market, but is regulated by considerations of what is the smallest amount upon which he and his family can live. That this is the case is proved by the well-known fact that, in those counties where wages are the lowest, they always fluctuate with the price of wheat. If wheat is low, say 40s. a quarter, wages are gs. and 10s. a week; they are advanced to lis. or 12s. if wheat rises to 60s. or 70s. a quarter. When wages depend, as they ordinarily do, upon demand and supply, all fluctuations in wages must be produced either by an alteration in the amount of capital embarked in industry, or by some change in the number of labourers seeking employment. There is no reason why an advance or a decline in the price of wheat should affect either the amount of capital invested in agriculture, or the number of the labourers. The way, however, in which these fluctuations in agricultural wages are brought about is perfectly well known: farmers, when they meet at market, talk the subject of wages over with each other; if there is a rise in the price of wheat they come to a general conclusion that their labourers are unable to live on their present wage...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1871 Excerpt: ... loss, instead of being 2s. 6d. a week, is is. a week; still this represents an income tax of nearly 7 per cent., and is a very ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:70 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.15 inPublished:May 20, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:021752768X

ISBN - 13:9780217527682

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