Mansfield Park

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Mansfield Park

by Jane Austen
Introduction by Kathryn Sutherland, Tony Tanner

Penguin Publishing Group | April 29, 2003 | Trade Paperback

Mansfield Park is rated 3 out of 5 by 2.
Taken from the poverty of her parents' home in Portsmouth, Fanny Price is brought up with her rich cousins at Mansfield Park, acutely aware of her humble rank and with her cousin Edmund as her sole ally. During her uncle's absence in Antigua, the Crawford's arrive in the neighbourhood bringing with them the glamour of London life and a reckless taste for flirtation. Mansfield Park is considered Jane Austen's first mature work and, with its quiet heroine and subtle examination of social position and moral integrity, one of her most profound.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 480 pages, 7.76 × 5.05 × 0.96 in

Published: April 29, 2003

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0141439807

ISBN - 13: 9780141439808

Found in: Fiction and Literature

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Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Gets better upon further acquaintance! One of the 2 longest novels by Jane Austen, this one depicts the life of poor Fanny Price who, upon the generosity on her uncle and aunt, is welcome to their home of Mansfield Park as a sort of “charity project”. Here she will grow among here snobbish cousins Maria and Julia, but also through her relationship with her cousin Edmund who will forge her character and give her firm principles of which she will never relinquish, even when a certain Henry Crawford comes into the picture and tries to seduce her. Of all the 6 novels, this used to be the one I most dreaded for one simple reason: I use to hate Fanny Price. Why? Because she made me think of a certain heroine of the Bronte sisters I still struggle with, for I saw them as a lot alike in character and behavior. But I must admit that Mansfield Park was better the second time around. I actually enjoyed Fanny and her grounded and highly reflected behavior, especially when it comes to Henry Crawford. I also liked how the author developed the relationship of Edmund and Mary Crawford and all the struggles surrounding it on his side. So all in all, this novel grows on you as you reread it. For more about this book and many more, visit my blog at : ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
Date published: 2013-06-30
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Entertaining Perhaps not my favorite Jane Austen novel, but still enjoyable. I never really became a huge fan of Fanny's, I found her frustrating at times, but she's still a very believable character.
Date published: 2010-02-23

– More About This Product –

Mansfield Park

Mansfield Park

by Jane Austen
Introduction by Kathryn Sutherland, Tony Tanner

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 480 pages, 7.76 × 5.05 × 0.96 in

Published: April 29, 2003

Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0141439807

ISBN - 13: 9780141439808

About the Book

New chronology and further reading; Tony Tanner's original introduction reinstated
Edited with an introduction by Kathryn Sutherland.

Read from the Book

Chapter IAbout thirty years ago Miss Maria Ward, of Huntingdon,with only seven thousand pounds, had the good luckto captivate Sir Thomas Bertram, of Mansfield Park,in the county of Northampton, and to be thereby raisedto the rank of a baronet's lady, with all the comfortsand consequences of an handsome house and large income.All Huntingdon exclaimed on the greatness of the match,and her uncle, the lawyer, himself, allowed her to be at leastthree thousand pounds short of any equitable claim to it.She had two sisters to be benefited by her elevation;and such of their acquaintance as thought Miss Ward and MissFrances quite as handsome as Miss Maria, did not scrupleto predict their marrying with almost equal advantage.But there certainly are not so many men of large fortunein the world as there are pretty women to deserve them.Miss Ward, at the end of half a dozen years, foundherself obliged to be attached to the Rev. Mr. Norris,a friend of her brother-in-law, with scarcely anyprivate fortune, and Miss Frances fared yet worse.Miss Ward's match, indeed, when it came to the point,was not contemptible: Sir Thomas being happily ableto give his friend an income in the living of Mansfield;and Mr. and Mrs. Norris began their career of conjugalfelicity with very little less than a thousand a year.But Miss Frances married, in the common phrase,to disoblige her family, and by fixing on a lieutenantof marines, without education, fortune, or connexions,did it very thoroughly. She could har
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From the Publisher

Taken from the poverty of her parents' home in Portsmouth, Fanny Price is brought up with her rich cousins at Mansfield Park, acutely aware of her humble rank and with her cousin Edmund as her sole ally. During her uncle's absence in Antigua, the Crawford's arrive in the neighbourhood bringing with them the glamour of London life and a reckless taste for flirtation. Mansfield Park is considered Jane Austen's first mature work and, with its quiet heroine and subtle examination of social position and moral integrity, one of her most profound.

About the Author

Jane Austen (1775-1817) was extremely modest about her own genius but has become one of English literature's most famous women writers. She is also the author of Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Persuasion, and Northanger Abbey. Kathryn Sutherland is a reader in English at St Anne's College, Oxford. Tony Tanner was a Fellow of King's College, Cambridge, and Professor of English and American Literature at the University of Cambridge.

Editorial Reviews

"Never did any novelist make more use of an impeccable sense of human values."
--Virginia Woolf