Pennsylvania in Public Memory: Reclaiming the Industrial Past by Carolyn KitchPennsylvania in Public Memory: Reclaiming the Industrial Past by Carolyn Kitch

Pennsylvania in Public Memory: Reclaiming the Industrial Past

byCarolyn Kitch

Paperback | January 24, 2012

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What stories do we tell about America’s once-great industries at a time when they are fading from the landscape? Pennsylvania in Public Memory attempts to answer that question, exploring the emergence of a heritage culture of industry and its loss through the lens of its most representative industrial state. Based on news coverage, interviews, and more than two hundred heritage sites, this book traces the narrative themes that shape modern public memory of coal, steel, railroading, lumber, oil, and agriculture, and that collectively tell a story about national as well as local identity in a changing social and economic world.

Carolyn Kitch is Professor of Journalism in the School of Communications and Theater at Temple University. Carolyn Kitch is Professor of Journalism in the School of Communications and Theater at Temple University.
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Title:Pennsylvania in Public Memory: Reclaiming the Industrial PastFormat:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.75 inPublished:January 24, 2012Publisher:Penn State University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0271052201

ISBN - 13:9780271052205

Reviews

Table of Contents

Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Public Memory and the Legacies of Labor

1 “Almost a Nation”: The History of Industrial Heritage in Pennsylvania

2 “A Journey That Will Inspire”: Regions, Routes, and Rails

3 “Overcomin’ What Nature Put in Your Way”: Rural Heritage and Pioneer Mythology

4 “Where I Came From, How I Got Here”: Ethnic Diversity, Cultural Tourism, and the Memory of Immigration

5 “Deep Veins of Loss”: Sacrifice and Heroism in Coal Country

6 “From Our Family to Yours”: Personal Meanings of Work in Factory Tourism

7 “Steel Made This Town”: An Unfinished Story in Uncertain Times

8 “What’s the Use of Wond’rin’?”: The Questions of Industrial Heritage

Epilogue: The Future of Pennsylvania’s Past

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Editorial Reviews

“Kitch offers up a fascinating survey of industrial historic sites and interpretation in this volume. Pennsylvania, deeply embedded in the history of industry and energy extraction, provides an excellent case study for her analysis. Given the vast array of sites that she visited, Kitch weaves together a discussion that is logically organized and clearly argued. My only problem with this book is deciding whether to assign it to students in my public history course or to those who take my class on Pennsylvania history. Given her valuable critical insights, it would be worth it to assign Pennsylvania in Public Memory in both.”—John Bloom, H-Penn