People Who Eat Darkness: Murder, Grief And A Journey Into Japan's Shadows

Paperback | March 5, 2012

byRichard Lloyd Parry

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An incisive and compelling account of the case of Lucie Blackman. Lucie Blackman -- tall, blonde, and 21 years old -- stepped out into the vastness of Tokyo in the summer of 2000, and disappeared forever. The following winter, her dismembered remains were found buried in a seaside cave.

The seven months inbetween had seen a massive search for the missing girl, involving Japanese policemen, British private detectives, Australian dowsers and Lucie's desperate, but bitterly divided, parents. As the case unfolded, it drew the attention of prime ministers and sado-masochists, ambassadors and con-men, and reporters from across the world. Had Lucie been abducted by a religious cult, or snatched by human traffickers? Who was the mysterious man she had gone to meet? And what did her work, as a 'hostess' in the notorious Roppongi district of Tokyo, really involve?

Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, has followed the case since Lucie's disappearance. Over the course of a decade, he has travelled to four continents to interview those caught up in the story, fought off a legal attack in the Japanese courts, and worked undercover as a barman in a Roppongi strip club. He has talked exhaustively to Lucie's friends and family and won unique access to the Japanese detectives who investigated the case. And he has delved into the mind and background of the man accused of the crime -- Joji Obara, described by the judge as 'unprecedented and extremely evil'.

With the finesse of a novelist, he reveals the astonishing truth about Lucie and her fate. People Who Eat Darkness is, by turns, a non-fiction thriller, a courtroom drama and the biography of both a victim and a killer. It is the story of a young woman who fell prey to unspeakable evil, and of a loving family torn apart by grief. And it is a fascinating insight into one of the world's most baffling and mysterious societies, a light shone into dark corners of Japan that the rest of the world has never glimpsed before.


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From the Publisher

An incisive and compelling account of the case of Lucie Blackman. Lucie Blackman -- tall, blonde, and 21 years old -- stepped out into the vastness of Tokyo in the summer of 2000, and disappeared forever. The following winter, her dismembered remains were found buried in a seaside cave. The seven months inbetween had seen a massive sea...

RICHARD LLOYD PARRY, an award-winning foreign correspondent, is the Asia editor of The Times, based in Tokyo.From the Hardcover edition.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 7.73 × 5.04 × 1.2 inPublished:March 5, 2012Publisher:Random House UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0099502550

ISBN - 13:9780099502555

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Customer Reviews of People Who Eat Darkness: Murder, Grief And A Journey Into Japan's Shadows

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Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting to learn about the underbelly of a different society.
Date published: 2013-12-25

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Editorial Reviews

"People Who Eat Darkness is an extraordinary, compulsive and brilliant book. The account of the crime, the investigation and the trial -- particularly in its knowledge and understanding of the Japan in which this tragedy took place -- is both insightful and gripping; the attempt to understand Obara is fascinating but never ghoulish; and finally, and most of all, the compassion for Lucie Blackman and her family is very, very moving." —David Peace