Performing Music: Shared Concerns by Jonathan Dunsby

Performing Music: Shared Concerns

byJonathan Dunsby

Paperback | April 30, 1999

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Shared Concerns: Performing Music is about aspects of music-making that have not previously been considered together and in an accessible form. It deals with `performance studies'' as a coherent subject, exploring such issues as the ideas of anxiety and artistry, recent thought in the musical literature, tensions between Romanticism nad Modernism, and the sound and design of music. It is written in non-technical language so that the lay reader will be able to gain an insight into how performers think, and what they think about. It is performers who bring classical music to a worldwide public, and yet the public is largely unaware of what it feels like to perform music, what aspects of the activity are a mystery even to the musicians themselves, and which are amenable to scrutiny, experiment, and improvement. The book offers a sustained but compact argument in a rich and entertaining narrative.
Jonathan Dunsby is at Reading University.
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Title:Performing Music: Shared ConcernsFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:112 pages, 8.5 X 5.43 X 0.31 inShipping dimensions:112 pages, 8.5 X 5.43 X 0.31 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198166427

ISBN - 13:9780198166429

Appropriate for ages: All ages

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From the Author

Shared Concerns: Performing Music is about aspects of music-making that have not previously been considered together and in an accessible form. It deals with `performance studies'' as a coherent subject, exploring such issues as the ideas of anxiety and artistry, recent thought in the musical literature, tensions between Romanticism nad Modernism, and the sound and design of music. It is written in non-technical language so that the lay reader will be able to gain an insight into how performers think, and what they think about. It is performers who bring classical music to a worldwide public, and yet the public is largely unaware of what it feels like to perform music, what aspects of the activity are a mystery even to the musicians themselves, and which are amenable to scrutiny, experiment, and improvement. The book offers a sustained but compact argument in a rich and entertaining narrative.

From Our Editors

Performing Music: Shared Concerns is about various aspects of music-making that have not previously been considered together and in this accessible form. It deals with 'performance studies' as a coherent subject, exploring such issues as the ideas of anxiety and artistry, recent thought in musical literature, tensions between Romanticism and Modernism, and the sound and design of music. It is written in non-technical language in order that the lay reader may easily gain an insight into how performers think, and what they think about. It is performers who bring classical music to a worldwide public, and yet the public is largely unaware of what it feels like to perform music, what aspects of the activity are a mystery even to the musicians themselves, and which are amenable to scrutiny, experiment, and improvement. This book offers a sustained but compact argument in a rich and entertaining narrative.

Editorial Reviews

`I suspect there is something for everyone in these thoughtfully assembled musings ... like all expert performers, Dunsby draws upon a lifetime of preparation (both thoughts and deeds) in executing an immensely difficult but seemingly effortless performative task ... a brilliant and exciting performance ... music lovers, professionals and academic musicians alike - will be enriched and their thoughts (and deeds?) provoked in the best possible sense ... the abundant ideas and sheer elegance of thought in this book will be a source of inspiration.'' John Rink, Music and Letters, Vol. 77, No. 2, May ''96