Peter: The Myth, the Man and the writings

by Lapham, Fred

Sheffield Academic Press | October 1, 2004 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

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This book critically examines all the early and important Petrine pseudepigrapha to identify a distinctive Petrine theology which, it is believed, was later swamped by the tide of western orthodoxy. Despite the diversity of the books and tractates, ranging from Jewish-Christian writings to avowedly Gnostic works, a remarkably consistent Petrine tradition does emerge; and Peter is shown essentially to be neither the impetuous, undiscerning, and even vacillating figure portrayed in the Gospels and Acts, nor the magisterial and pontifical figure of later Church tradition, but a visionary who was concerned above all to hold together both the moral and cognitive aspects of the Faith.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 1, 2004

Publisher: Sheffield Academic Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0567263177

ISBN - 13: 9780567263179

Found in: Religion and Spirituality

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Kobo eBookPeter: The Myth, the Man and the writings

Peter: The Myth, the Man and the writings

by Lapham, Fred

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 1, 2004

Publisher: Sheffield Academic Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0567263177

ISBN - 13: 9780567263179

From the Publisher

This book critically examines all the early and important Petrine pseudepigrapha to identify a distinctive Petrine theology which, it is believed, was later swamped by the tide of western orthodoxy. Despite the diversity of the books and tractates, ranging from Jewish-Christian writings to avowedly Gnostic works, a remarkably consistent Petrine tradition does emerge; and Peter is shown essentially to be neither the impetuous, undiscerning, and even vacillating figure portrayed in the Gospels and Acts, nor the magisterial and pontifical figure of later Church tradition, but a visionary who was concerned above all to hold together both the moral and cognitive aspects of the Faith.