Phenomenological Interpretation Of Kant's Critique Of Pure Reason by Martin HeideggerPhenomenological Interpretation Of Kant's Critique Of Pure Reason by Martin Heidegger

Phenomenological Interpretation Of Kant's Critique Of Pure Reason

byMartin HeideggerEditorMartin HeideggerTranslated byParvis Emad

Hardcover | November 22, 1997

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The text of Martin Heidegger's 1927-28 university lecture course on Emmanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason presents a close interpretive reading of the first two parts of this masterpiece of modern philosophy. In this course, Heidegger continues the task he enunciated in Being and Time as the problem of dismatling the history of ontology, using temporality as a clue. Within this context the relation between philosophy, ontology, and fundamental ontology is shown to be rooted in the genesis of the modern mathematical sciences. Heidegger demonstrates that objectification of beings as beings is inseparable from knowledge a priori, the central problem of Kant's Critique. He concludes that objectification rests on the productive power of imagination, a process that involves temporality, which is the basic constitution of humans as beings.

Parvis Emad is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at DePaul University and the founding co-editor (with Kenneth Maly) of Heidegger Studies. Also with Maly, he has translated Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit by Martin Heidegger and Encounters and Dialogues with Martin Heidegger by Heinrich Wiegand Petzet.Kenneth Maly is Professor of Philos...
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Title:Phenomenological Interpretation Of Kant's Critique Of Pure ReasonFormat:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.28 inPublished:November 22, 1997Publisher:Indiana University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0253332583

ISBN - 13:9780253332585

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The text of Martin Heidegger's 1927-28 university lecture course on Emmanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason presents a close interpretive reading of the first two parts of this masterpiece of modern philosophy. In this course Heidegger continues the task he enunciated in Being and Time as the problem of dismantling the history of ontology, using temporality as a clue. Within this context the relation between philosophy, ontology, and fundamental ontology is shown to be rooted in the genesis of the modern mathematical sciences. Heidegger demonstrates that objectification of beings as beings is inseparable from knowledge a priori, the central problem of Kant's Critique. He concludes that objectification rests on the productive power of imagination, a process that involves temporality as the basic constitution of humans as beings. This is an essential work for students of Heidegger, Kant, modern philosophy, and contemporary phenomenology