Philosophic Grammar Of The English Language; In Connection With The Laws Of Matter And Of Thought

Paperback | February 8, 2012

byWilliam Samuel Cardell

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1827 Excerpt: ... compose it. According as one or the other of these ideas prevails, the verb is to be singular, or plural. Pronouns are often improperly used for adjectives; as "see them boys," "set back them chairs." This aukwardness is confined to the plural form, as we do not hear any one say, " move him chair." Foreign terms are some times used for English, They are inconsistent with purity and elegance, and on these accounts should be avoided., For the French, ten dollars per quarter: a quarter. Questions frequently arise respecting the apostrophic », in adjectives of personal relation, more especially when several of these adjectives refer to the same noun. Jane's and Eliza's books. Jane and Eliza's books. The first expression refers separately to Jane's books, and to Eliza's books, as different parcels, or those to which Jane and Eliza do not stand related in joint interest. Jane and Eliza's books are those with which Jane and Eliza have some joint concern. The word had is often improperly used before the adjectives rather or better; I had rather not stay-you had better remain here. Leave out the adjectives rather and better, the impropriety is then seen at once. "What method had he best take in a circumstance so critical?"--Harris--Hermes. The past tense verb is improperly used for the participial adjective. He has iiient. I should have went, if 1 had have known it. "Two negatives, hj English, it is said, destroy each other, and amount to an affirmative." Such a rule is altogether a mistake. A wrong use of words, however, frequently takes place, which it is the honest intention of this rule to rectify. If a person makes the assertion, "I dont want none," the probability is he does not mean what he says. The mistake is in the fact, not in the grammar. The person...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1827 Excerpt: ... compose it. According as one or the other of these ideas prevails, the verb is to be singular, or plural. Pronouns are often imp...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:74 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.15 inPublished:February 8, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217528341

ISBN - 13:9780217528344

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