Physics For Scientists & Engineers With Modern Physics, Vol. 3 (chs 36-44)

Hardcover | August 29, 2008

byDouglas C. Giancoli

not yet rated|write a review

For the calculus-based General Physics course primarily taken by engineers and science majors (including physics majors).

 

This long-awaited and extensive revision maintains Giancoli's reputation for creating carefully crafted, highly accurate and precise physics texts. Physics for Scientists and Engineers combines outstanding pedagogy with a clear and direct narrative and applications that draw the student into the physics. The new edition also features an unrivaled suite of media and on-line resources that enhance the understanding of physics.

 

This book is written for students. It aims to explain physics in a readable and interesting manner that is accessible and clear, and to teach students by anticipating their needs and difficulties without oversimplifying.

 

Physics is a description of reality, and thus each topic begins with concrete observations and experiences that students can directly relate to. We then move on to the generalizations and more formal treatment of the topic. Not only does this make the material more interesting and easier to understand, but it is closer to the way physics is actually practiced.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$104.01

In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25
HURRY, ONLY 1 LEFT!

From the Publisher

For the calculus-based General Physics course primarily taken by engineers and science majors (including physics majors).   This long-awaited and extensive revision maintains Giancoli's reputation for creating carefully crafted, highly accurate and precise physics texts. Physics for Scientists and Engineers combines outstandi...

From the Jacket

ELECTRONIC PHYSICAL DESIGN is an excellent text for readers learning how to improve the physical design of products. The focus of the book is on how to take a circuit, which has been successfully simulated, from the design stage to the production stage. The book uses a unique approach, by using an example of each physical design co...

Douglas C. Giancoli obtained his BA in physics (summa cum laude) from UC Berkeley, his MS in physics at MIT, and his PhD in elementary particle physics back at the UC Berkeley. He spent 2 years as a post-doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley’s Virus lab developing skills in molecular biology and biophysics. His mentors include Nobel winners...
Format:HardcoverDimensions:352 pages, 10.6 × 8.4 × 0.7 inPublished:August 29, 2008Publisher:Pearson EducationLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0132274000

ISBN - 13:9780132274005

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Physics For Scientists & Engineers With Modern Physics, Vol. 3 (chs 36-44)

Reviews

Extra Content

Read from the Book

In most electronics design courses, whether academic or professional, the emphasis is on circuit design: choosing the right devices, putting them in the proper arrangement, and completing the operational and diagnostic analysis. Currently, there is no focus on the issues that would have to be addressed if the circuit was built in a permanent fashion; nor an opportunity to deal with the issues relevant to making hundreds or thousands of circuits. This book was written with this need in mind. Electronic Physical Design emphasizes the physical aspects, and this emphasis makes this design reference book unique. In this book, you will not find suggestions for designing a phase locked loop, an operational amplifier, or a microcontroller circuit. Instead, you will find details about how to take a circuit that has been successfully simulated or tested in prototype form and actually design a physical prototype suitable for producing one, 100, or tens of thousands of circuits. This book uses a unique approach by giving an example of each physical design consideration and applying it to the design of a "boom box": a portable, personal stereo system complete with radio, tape player, CD player, and speakers. By doing this readers can readily grasp the concepts and understand how they would apply to a specific circuit. This book is divided into five main sections. Section I sets the stage for the entire text. The Introduction provides a brief overview of the field of electronics and the dramatic advances made over the past century. It also introduces the topic of safety, and lays a solid theoretical and practical foundation for future electrical safety. Chapter 1 introduces various factors that must be considered when designing an electronic product. The list of factors is extensive, but by no means exhaustive. Many specialty products will have other factors that must be considered. This chapter also addresses formal documentation of the circuit design. Section 11 (Chapters 2-5) focuses on the various types of electronic components available for design, the subtypes of each component, and the physical packages they come in. Chapter 2 discusses the ideal characteristics of IC packages and IC substrate materials and compares their performances. This chapter shows the physical options available and also how to choose among those options. Chapter 3 discusses the functions and desirable characteristics of fixed and variable resistors, and summarizes and compares existing resistor types. It will help readers choose the right resistor type for any given application. Chapter 4 focuses on capacitors. Many capacitor types exist, and it is often difficult to know which type is preferable for a given application. The material in this chapter should be very helpful in this area. Chapter 5 discusses the package types available for discrete diodes and transistors, along with the relative advantages and disadvantages of those package types. The second part of this chapter discusses the basics of connectors: desirable characteristics, available materials, and the relative characteristics of each material. This chapter provides help in choosing the right diode or transistor package, or connector. Section III (Chapters 6-8) covers the process through which integrated circuits (ICs) are made. Chapter 6 begins with a short history of ICs, followed by a discussion of the substrates used for making them, and covers photolithography, which is the heart of the IC manufacturing process. Chapter 7 covers the many processes used to add materials to the substrates discussed in Chapter 6. Chapter 8 covers the main processes used to remove materials from the substrates. Each process has its advantages and disadvantages, and so each process is used for different applications. Chapter 8 concludes with a discussion on the future of electronic devices. Section IV (Chapters 9-12) covers the manufacturing processes through which IC packages, hybrids, multi-chip modules (MCMs), printed wiring boards (PWBs), PWB assemblies, motherboards, and backplanes are made. Chapter 9 covers IC packages, including the three main methods of electrically and mechanically attaching IC chips to the package. Chapter 10 covers the next level of packaging: hybrids, MCMs, and PWBs. It also includes some guidelines for determining conductor width and spacing. Chapter 11 covers the field of PWB assemblies, which brings together components discussed in Chapters 3 through 9. Soldering, which is the main method of mechanically and electrically attaching components to PWBs, is also discussed. This chapter also discusses the present challenges in PWB assembly. Chapter 12 discusses the next level of packaging-the motherboard or backplane, both of which interconnect multiple PWB assemblies. An important section on the significance of the design phase when determining the cost of a product concludes the chapter. Section V (Chapter 13-19) completes the book by providing insights into the theory and practice of making very high quality electronic products through wise physical design decisions. Chapter 13 addresses the key issues of reliability and quality. Making a prototype of a circuit is difficult, but it is important to know what it takes to make every physical copy of the circuit perform appropriately and continue to do so for the life of the product. This chapter also discusses the elements that make a design robust. Chapter 14 and 15 address thermal issues in physical design. Temperature is usually a key factor in physical design considerations. Addressing temperature early in the design process will dramatically aid in resolving thermal issues that could make or break the product. These chapters also address the physical impact of heat, how to remove it, and how to calculate device temperatures. Chapters 16, 17, and 18 help readers design for vibration, shock, humidity, and dust. These are areas typically not considered by electronic designers, but careful attention to these issues will result in a much better product. Chapter 19 provides a brief introduction into the field of electromagnetic compatibility and explains what a "green" product is. It looks ahead to several areas of electronic devices and provides an overall conclusion. I hope that by pulling all these materials together into a single reference book, designers will be able to use it to improve the physical design of their products. This book is the outgrowth of several years of teaching a university level course on electronic design, and is intended to serve both the academic community and the world of practicing professionals.

Table of Contents

NOTE: CHS 36-44 NOT FINAL; TOC TAKEN FROM PSE3

CHAPTER 36: SPECIAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY

36-1 Galilean—Newtonian Relativity

*36-2 The Michelson-Morley Experiment

36-3 Postulates of the Special Theory of Relativity

36-4 Simultaneity

36-5 Time Dilation and the Twin Paradox

36-6 Length Contraction

36-7 Four-Dimensional Space-Time

36-8 Galilean and Lorentz Transformations

36-9 Relativistic Momentum and Mass

36-10 The Ultimate Speed

36-11 Energy and Mass; E=mc 2

36-12 Doppler Shift for Light

36-13 The Impact of Special Relativity

SUMMARY

QUESTIONS

PROBLEMS

GENERAL PROBLEMS

 

CHAPTER 37: EARLY QUANTUM THEORY AND MODELS OF THE ATOM

37-1 Planck’s Quantum Hypothesis

37-2 Photon Theory of Light and the Photoelectric Effect

37-3 Photons and the Compton Effect

37-4 Photon Interactions; Pair Production

37-5 Wave-Particle Duality; the Principle of Complementarity

37-6 Wave Nature of Matter

*37-7 Electron Microscopes

37-8 Early Models of the Atom

37-9 Atomic Spectra: Key to the Structure of the Atom

37-10 The Bohr Model

37-11 DeBroglie’s Hypothesis Applied to Atoms

SUMMARY

QUESTIONS

PROBLEMS

GENERAL PROBLEMS

 

CHAPTER 38: QUANTUM MECHANICS

38-1 Quantum Mechanics—A New Theory

38-2 The Wave Function and Its Interpretation; the Double-Slit Experiment

38-3 The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

38-4 Philosophic Implications; Probability Versus Determinism

38-5 The Schrodinger Equation in One Dimension—Time-Independent Form

*38-6 Time-Dependent Schrodinger Equation

38-7 Free Particles; Plane Waves and Wave Packets

38-8 Particle in an Infinitely Deep Square Well Potential (a Rigid Box)

*38-9 Finite Potential Well

38-10 Tunneling through a Barrier

SUMMARY

QUESTIONS

PROBLEMS

GENERAL PROBLEMS

 

CHAPTER 39: QUANTUM MECHANICS OF ATOMS

39-1 Quantum-Mechanical View of Atoms

39-2 Hydrogen Atom: Schrodinger Equation and Quantum Numbers

39-3 Hydrogen Atom Wave Functions

39-4 Complex Atoms; the Exclusion Principle

39-5 The Periodic Table of Elements

39-6 X-Ray Spectra and Atomic Number

*39-7 Magnetic Dipole Moments; Total Angular Momentum

*39-8 Fluorescence and Phosphorescence

*39-9 Lasers

*39-10 Holography

SUMMARY

QUESTIONS

PROBLEMS

GENERAL PROBLEMS

 

CHAPTER 40: MOLECULES AND SOLIDS

40-1 Bonding in Molecules

40-2 Potential-Energy Diagrams for Molecules

40-3 Weak (van der Waals) Bonds

40-4 Molecular Spectra

40-5 Bonding in Solids

40-6 Free-Electron Theory of Metals

40-7 Band Theory of Solids  

40-8 Semiconductors and Doping

*40-9 Semiconductor Diodes

*40-10 Transistors and Integrated Circuits

SUMMARY

QUESTIONS

PROBLEMS

GENERAL PROBLEMS

 

CHAPTER 41: NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIOACTIVITY

41-1 Structure and Properties of the Nucleus

41-2 Binding Energy and Nuclear Forces

41-3 Radioactivity

41-4 Alpha Decay

41-5 Beta Decay

41-6 Gamma Decay

41-7 Conservation of Nucleon Number and Other Conservation Laws

41-8 Half-Life and Rate of Decay

41-9 Decay Series

41-10 Radioactive Dating

41-11 Detection of Radiation

SUMMARY

QUESTIONS

PROBLEMS

GENERAL PROBLEMS

 

CHAPTER 42: NUCLEAR ENERGY: EFECTS AND USES OF RADIATION

42-1 Nuclear Reactions and the Transmutations of Elements

42-2 Cross Section

42-3 Nuclear Fission; Nuclear Reactors

42-4 Fusion

42-5 Passage of radiation through matter; Radiation Damage

42-6 Measurement of Radiation—Dosimetry

*42-7 Radiation Therapy

*42-8 Tracers

*42-9 Imaging by Tomography: CAT Scans, and Emission Tomography

*42-10 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

SUMMARY

QUESTIONS

PROBLEMS

GENERAL PROBLEMS

 

CHAPTER 43: ELEMENTARY PARTICLES

43-1 High-Energy Particles

43-2 Particle Accelerators and Detectors

43-3 Beginnings of Elementary Particle Physics–Particle Exchange

43-4 Particles and Antiparticles

43-5 Particle Interactions and Conservation Laws

43-6 Particle Classification

43-7 Particle Stability and Resonances

43-8 Strange Particles

43-9 Quarks

43-10 The “Standard Model”: Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and the Electroweak Theory

43-11 Grand Unified Theories

SUMMARY

QUESTIONS

PROBLEMS

GENERAL PROBLEMS

 

CHAPTER 44: ASTROPHYSICS AND COSMOLOGY

44-1 Stars and Galaxies

44-2 Stellar Evolution; the Birth and Death of Stars

44-3 General Relativity: Gravity and the Curvature of Space

44-4 The Expanding Universe

44-5 The Big Bang and the Cosmic Microwave Background

44-6 The Standard Cosmological Model: Early History of the Universe

44-7 The Future of the Universe?

SUMMARY

QUESTIONS

PROBLEMS

GENERAL PROBLEMS