Physiognomy And The Meaning Of Expression In Nineteenth-century Culture: Physiognomy & The Meaning Of E by Lucy HartleyPhysiognomy And The Meaning Of Expression In Nineteenth-century Culture: Physiognomy & The Meaning Of E by Lucy Hartley

Physiognomy And The Meaning Of Expression In Nineteenth-century Culture: Physiognomy & The Meaning…

byLucy HartleyEditorGillian Beer

Paperback | January 19, 2006

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In Physiognomy and the Meaning of Expression in Nineteenth-Century Culture, Lucy Hartley examines the emergence of physiognomy as a form of popular science. Physiognomy posited an understanding of the inner meaning of human character from observations of physical appearances, usually facial expressions. Taking the physiognomical teachings of Johann Caspar Lavater as a starting-point, Hartley considers the extent to which attempts to read the mind and judge the character through expression can provide descriptions of human nature.
Lucy Hartley is Lecturer in English at the University of Southampton.
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Title:Physiognomy And The Meaning Of Expression In Nineteenth-century Culture: Physiognomy & The Meaning…Format:PaperbackDimensions:260 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.59 inPublished:January 19, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521022428

ISBN - 13:9780521022422

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Table of Contents

Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. A science of mind?: theories of nature, theories of man; 2. The argument for expression: Charles Bell and the concept of design; 3. What is the character: the nature of ordinariness in the paintings of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood; 4. 'Beauty of character and beauty of aspect': expression, feeling, and the contemplation of emotion; 5. Universal expressions: Darwin and the naturalisation of emotion; 6. The promise of a new psychology?; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"This lucidly-written and useful book amply demonstrates how the blindnesses of physiognomy still offer insights into the nineteenth century and beyond." Wordsworth Circle