Plain Folk in a Rich Man's War: Class and Dissent in Confederate Georgia

by David Williams

UNIVERSITY PRESS OF FLORIDA | January 1, 2002 | Mass Market Paperbound

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This compelling and engaging book sheds new light on how planter self-interest, government indifference, and the very nature of southern society produced a rising tide of dissent and disaffection among Georgia's plain folk during the Civil War. The authors make extensive use of local newspapers, court records, manuscript collections, and other firsthand accounts to tell a story of latent class resentment that emerged full force under wartime pressures and undermined southern support for the Confederacy.

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 9 × 6 × 0.63 in

Published: January 1, 2002

Publisher: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF FLORIDA

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0813028361

ISBN - 13: 9780813028361

Found in: Science and Nature

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Plain Folk in a Rich Man's War: Class and Dissent in Confederate Georgia

Plain Folk in a Rich Man's War: Class and Dissent in Confederate Georgia

by David Williams

Format: Mass Market Paperbound

Dimensions: 9 × 6 × 0.63 in

Published: January 1, 2002

Publisher: UNIVERSITY PRESS OF FLORIDA

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0813028361

ISBN - 13: 9780813028361

From the Publisher

This compelling and engaging book sheds new light on how planter self-interest, government indifference, and the very nature of southern society produced a rising tide of dissent and disaffection among Georgia's plain folk during the Civil War. The authors make extensive use of local newspapers, court records, manuscript collections, and other firsthand accounts to tell a story of latent class resentment that emerged full force under wartime pressures and undermined southern support for the Confederacy.