Plato's Complete Philosophy Dialogues Anthologies (25 in 1) by Plato

Plato's Complete Philosophy Dialogues Anthologies (25 in 1)

byPlato

Kobo ebook | January 14, 2014

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Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of natural philosophy, science, and Western philosophy. Plato was originally a student of Socrates, and was as much influenced by his thinking as by what he saw as his teacher's unjust death.
Plato's sophistication as a writer is evident in his Socratic dialogues; thirty-five dialogues and thirteen letters have been ascribed to him. Plato's writings have been published in several fashions; this has led to several conventions regarding the naming and referencing of Plato's texts.

Contents

The Republic
Symposium
Phaedrus
Apology
Euthyphro
Phaedo
Gorgias
Meno
Timaeus
Laws
Theaetetus
Sophist
Critias
Ion
Protagoras
Parmenides
Cratylus
Statesman
Crito
Charmides
Menexenus
Philebus
Lysis
Laches

Euthydemus

 

Euthyphro -
In the Euthyphro, Socrates is awaiting his trial for impiety. But before the trial begins, Plato would like to put the world on their trial, and convince them of ignorance in that very matter touching which Socrates is accused. An incident which may perhaps really have occurred in the family of Euthyphro, a learned Athenian diviner and soothsayer, furnishes the occasion of the discussion. Translated by B. Jowett.

Phaedo -
"The dead are first of all judged according to their deeds, and those who are incurable are thrust into Tartarus, from which they never come out."

Gorgias -
Socrates, who is attended by his inseparable disciple, Chaerephon, meets Callicles in the streets of Athens. He is informed that he has just missed an exhibition of Gorgias, which he regrets, because he was desirous, not of hearing Gorgias display his rhetoric, but of interrogating him concerning the nature of his art. Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Meno -
This Dialogue begins abruptly with a question of Meno, who asks, 'whether virtue can be taught.' Socrates replies that he does not as yet know what virtue is, and has never known anyone who did. Translated by by Benjamin Jowett

Timaeus -
Of all the writings of Plato the Timaeus is the most obscure and repulsive to the modern reader, and has nevertheless had the greatest influence over the ancient and mediaeval world. Translated by Benjamin Jowett.

Ion -
The Ion is the shortest, or nearly the shortest, of all the writings which bear the name of Plato, and is not authenticated by any early external testimony. The grace and beauty of this little work supply the only, and perhaps a sufficient, proof of its genuineness. The plan is simple; the dramatic interest consists entirely in the contrast between the irony of Socrates and the transparent vanity and childlike enthusiasm of the rhapsode Ion. Translated by Benjamin Jowett.

Protagoras -
The Protagoras, like several of the Dialogues of Plato, is put into the mouth of Socrates, who describes a conversation which had taken place between himself and the great Sophist at the house of Callias. Translated by B. Jowett.

Parmenides -
The awe with which Plato regarded the character of 'the great' Parmenides has extended to the dialogue which he calls by his name. None of the writings of Plato have been more copiously illustrated, both in ancient and modern times, and in none of them have the interpreters been more at variance with one another.

Title:Plato's Complete Philosophy Dialogues Anthologies (25 in 1)Format:Kobo ebookPublished:January 14, 2014Publisher:AGEB PublishingLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN:9990044049466

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