Play The Piano by Charles BukowskiPlay The Piano by Charles Bukowski

Play The Piano

byCharles Bukowski

Paperback | May 31, 2002

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Play the Piano introduces Charles Bukowski's poetry from the 1970s. He leads a life full of gambling and booze but also finds love. These poems are full of lechery and romance as he struggles to mature.

Charles Bukowski is one of America's best-known contemporary writers of poetry and prose, and, many would claim, its most influential and imitated poet. He was born in Andernach, Germany, and raised in Los Angeles, where he lived for fifty years. He published his first story in 1944, when he was twenty-four, and began writing poetry at...
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Title:Play The PianoFormat:PaperbackDimensions:128 pages, 8.94 × 5.88 × 0.32 inPublished:May 31, 2002Publisher:HarperCollins

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0876854374

ISBN - 13:9780876854372

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from not a huge collection but a great one The book title alone makes me love this collection of Bukowski's poetry. It's not a huge collection but it's a great one. I understand that Bukowski is not for everyone, and maybe because it's I'm not a huge poetry reader, but I love Bukowski's straight forwardness, loneliness, and grittiness. He really could care less, but in this weird alluring way.
Date published: 2017-04-03

Employee Review

This book of caustic, concise verse is most remarkable for its interesting title. The book itself is rather dull by Bukowski standards. He deals with the usual topics -- drinking, sex, relationships, getting into fights -- in various combinations, but his usual spark seems to be missing. If you're a fan of outlaw or beat poets you might enjoy it, but I would recommend Bukowski's Love is a Dog From Hell or even The Days Run Away Like Wild Horses over the Hills instead.