Plinys Women: Constructing Virtue and Creating Identity in the Roman World by Jacqueline M. CarlonPlinys Women: Constructing Virtue and Creating Identity in the Roman World by Jacqueline M. Carlon

Plinys Women: Constructing Virtue and Creating Identity in the Roman World

byJacqueline M. Carlon

Hardcover | June 22, 2009

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Pliny's Women offers a comprehensive consideration of the many women who appear in the letters of Pliny the Younger. Combining detailed prosopography with close literary analysis, Jacqueline Carlon examines the identities of the women whom Pliny includes and how they and the men with whom they are associated contribute both to this presentation of exemplary Romans and particularly to his own self-promotion. Virtually all of the named women in Pliny's nine-book corpus are considered. They form six distinct groups: those associated with opposition to the principate; the family of Pliny's mentor, Corellius Rufus; his own family members; women involved in testamentary disputes; ideal wives; and women of unseemly character. Detailed analysis of each letter mentioning women includes the identity of its recipient and everyone named within, its disposition within the collection, Pliny's language and style, and its significance to our perception of the changing social fabric of the early principate.
Title:Plinys Women: Constructing Virtue and Creating Identity in the Roman WorldFormat:HardcoverDimensions:280 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.87 inPublished:June 22, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521761328

ISBN - 13:9780521761321

Reviews

Table of Contents

1. Pliny: enemy of tyrants; 2. Pliny: model protégé; 3. Pliny: champion of the vulnerable; 4. Pliny: creator of the ideal wife; 5. Pliny: arbiter of virtue.

Editorial Reviews

"In sum, Carlon fulfils admirably her stated aim of examining how the letters concerning women aid in Pliny's self-representation... We can be grateful that Carlon alerts us so lucidly to Pliny's use of characterization and idealized images, and to the deliberation with which he deploys rhetorical structure, diction, and content, in pursuit of his autobiographical intent. " --BMCR