Poetry and Politics in the Cockney School: Keats, Shelley, Hunt and their Circle by Jeffrey N. CoxPoetry and Politics in the Cockney School: Keats, Shelley, Hunt and their Circle by Jeffrey N. Cox

Poetry and Politics in the Cockney School: Keats, Shelley, Hunt and their Circle

byJeffrey N. CoxEditorJames Chandler

Paperback | May 20, 2004

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Jeffrey N. Cox refines our conception of "second generation" Romanticism by placing it within the circle of writers around Leigh Hunt that came to be known as the "Cockney School." Cox challenges the traditional image of the Romantic poet as an isolated figure by recreating the social nature of the work of Shelley, Keats, Hunt, Hazlitt, Byron, and others. This book not only demonstrates convincingly that a "Cockney School" existed, but shows that it was committed to putting literature in the service of social, cultural, and political reform.
Title:Poetry and Politics in the Cockney School: Keats, Shelley, Hunt and their CircleFormat:PaperbackDimensions:300 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:May 20, 2004Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521604230

ISBN - 13:9780521604239

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Customer Reviews of Poetry and Politics in the Cockney School: Keats, Shelley, Hunt and their Circle

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface; or, the visionary company, INC.; 1. The 'Cockney School' attacks: or the anti-romantic ideology; 2. The Hunt era; 3. John Keats, coterie poet; 4. Staging hope: genre, myth and ideology in the dramas of the Hunt circle; 5. Cockney classicism: history with footnotes; 6. Final reckonings: Keats and Shelley on the wealth of the imagination.

Editorial Reviews

"Cox's well informed and instructive study of Hunt's "Cockney" circle, its writing,life,and times, tells an important story about romantic sociability and collective enterprise. Theresa M. Kelley South Centeral Review