Political Choice In Britain

Paperback | December 2, 2004

byHarold D. Clarke, David Sanders, Marianne C. Stewart

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This title includes the following features: New statement on elections and voting patterns from leading scholars in the field; Uses a variety of current data sources to describe and explain party support, turnout, and democratic satisfaction; Tests rival models of political choice

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This title includes the following features: New statement on elections and voting patterns from leading scholars in the field; Uses a variety of current data sources to describe and explain party support, turnout, and democratic satisfaction; Tests rival models of political choice

Harold D. Clarke is at Ashbel Smith Professor of Political Science, University of Texas at Dallas. David Sanders is at Professor of Government, University of Essex.

other books by Harold D. Clarke

Affluence, Austerity and Electoral Change in Britain
Affluence, Austerity and Electoral Change in Britain

Kobo ebook|Sep 12 2013

$32.39 online$41.99list price(save 22%)
see all books by Harold D. Clarke
Format:PaperbackDimensions:400 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.86 inPublished:December 2, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199266549

ISBN - 13:9780199266548

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction: Political Choice in Britain2. Theories of Party Support3. Party Support in Britain Before 20014. Electoral Choice in 20015. Electoral Choice and the 2001 Campaign6. The Dynamics and Nature of Party Identification7. Theories of Turnout8. The Decision (Not) to Vote9. The 2001 Election and Democracy in Britain10. Conclusion: Valenced Voting and Political Choice

Editorial Reviews

`Political Choice in Britain will undoubtedly be the starting point for much future research on British electoral behaviour.'British Journal of Politics and International Relations