Politics, Social Theory, Utopia and the World-System: Arguments in Political Sociology by C. El-ojeiliPolitics, Social Theory, Utopia and the World-System: Arguments in Political Sociology by C. El-ojeili

Politics, Social Theory, Utopia and the World-System: Arguments in Political Sociology

byC. El-ojeili

Hardcover | January 25, 2012

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It is common to hear that we live in unique, turbulent and crisis-ridden times and this turbulence, transformation and crisis are said to be deeply significant - perhaps threatening - for the human sciences. Responding to such claims, this book provides an accessible engagement with pressing contemporary topics, such as violence, social movements, equality, identity and democracy. Foregrounding the imagination of possibilities (utopia), the mapping of the present (theory), and the transformation of the world-system (historical and global questions), the book surveys central issues and paradigms in contemproary political sociology, urging a recommitment to certain concepts and traditions for guidance in thinking and acting in the world.
CHAMSY EL-OJEILI Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Victorian University of Wellington, New Zealand. He is the author ofFrom Left Communism to Post-Modernism: Reconsidering Emancipatory Discourse, and with Patrick Hayden, co-author ofCritical Theories of Globalization, and co-editor ofConfronting Globalization and Utopia: Critical Essays.
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Title:Politics, Social Theory, Utopia and the World-System: Arguments in Political SociologyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:237 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.87 inPublished:January 25, 2012Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230246109

ISBN - 13:9780230246102

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Table of Contents

Introduction On Sociology Traditions and Concepts Transformations Ideologies and Utopias Masses Identities Movements Violence Globalization Equality Concluding Reflections Notes Bibliography Index