Population Balances in Biomedical Engineering: Segregation Through the Distribution of Cell States by MARTIN HJORTSOPopulation Balances in Biomedical Engineering: Segregation Through the Distribution of Cell States by MARTIN HJORTSO

Population Balances in Biomedical Engineering: Segregation Through the Distribution of Cell States

byMARTIN HJORTSO

Hardcover | October 19, 2005

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The population balance modeling is a statistical approach for achieving accurate counts of any populations. It is an efficient way of counting traffic on roadways as well as to bacteria in lakes. In the biomedical world, it is used to count cell populations for the creation of biomaterials. Despite their undisputed accuracy, they have been underutilized for design and control purposes due to two main reasons: a) they are hard to solve and b) the functions that describe single-cell mechanisms and appear as parameters in these models are typically unknown.
Martin A. Hjortsø, Ph.D, is Chevron Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He received his master's degree in chemical engineering from the Technical University of Denmark in 1978 working in the area of computational fluid mechanics. His Ph.D. dissertation project, carried ou...
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Title:Population Balances in Biomedical Engineering: Segregation Through the Distribution of Cell StatesFormat:HardcoverDimensions:182 pages, 9.1 × 6 × 0.77 inPublished:October 19, 2005Publisher:McGraw-Hill EducationLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0071447687

ISBN - 13:9780071447683

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Table of Contents

PREFACE

NOMENCLATURE

Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter 2: Unstructured PBMs

Chapter 3: Steady-State Solutions

Chapter 4: Transient Solutions

Chapter 5: Cell Cycle Synchrony

Chapter 6: Growth by Branching

Chapter 7: Alternative Formulations

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX