Pornography and Representation in Greece and Rome by Amy Richlin

Pornography and Representation in Greece and Rome

EditorAmy Richlin

Paperback | December 1, 1995

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The first large-scale application of feminist theory to the study of Greek and Roman cultures, this book points to some striking similarities between our culture and that of the ancient world, challenging Foucauldian assumptions about the nature of sexuality. Covering such topics as vasepainting, tragic and comic drama from fifth-century Athens, Hellenistic philosophy and sex manuals, Roman history, poetry, wall-painting, representations of gladiatorial combat, and romance novels, the contributors approach sexuality from both sides of the feminist pornography debate, including theuse of film theory. A path-breaking application of feminist theory to the study of Greek and Roman cultures, this text offers new insight into the notion of sexuality in the ancient world.

About The Author

Amy Richlin is at University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
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Details & Specs

Title:Pornography and Representation in Greece and RomeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 9.25 × 6.26 × 1.06 inPublished:December 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195067231

ISBN - 13:9780195067231

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Table of Contents

Timeline of material covered in the text1. Robert F. Sutton, JR.: Pornography and Persuasion on Attic PotteryNancy Sorkin Rabinowitz: Tragedy and the Politics of Containment3. Alan Shapiro: Eros in Love: Pederasty and Pornography in Geece4. Bella Zweig: The Mute Nude Female Characters in Aristophanes' Plays5. Holt N. Parker: Love's Body Anatomized: The Ancient Erotic Handbooks and the Rhetoric of Society6. Sandra R. Joshel: The Body Female and the Body Politic: Livy's Lucretia and Verginia7. Molly Myerowitz: The Domestication of Desire: Ovid's Parva Tabella and the Theater of Love8. Amy Richlin: Reading Ovid's Rapes9. Shelby Brown: Death as Decoration: Scenes from the Arena on Roman Domestic Mosaics10. Helen E. Elsom: Callirhoe: Displaying the Phallic Woman11. Holly Montague: Sweet and Pleasant Passion: Female and Male Fantasy in Ancient Romance Novels12. Madeleine M. Henry: The Edible Woman: Athenaeus' Concept of the PornographicTerry Marsh: Afterword: The (Other) Maiden's TaleCredits for PhotographsBibliography [comprehensive]ContributorsIndex

From Our Editors

Can the pornographic be said to have existed in Greece and Rome? This new group of essays points to some striking similarities between our culture and those of the ancient world, challenging Foucauldian assumptions about the nature of sexuality. Covering such topics as vase painting, tragic and comic drama from fifth-century Athens, Hellenistic philosophy and sex manuals, Roman history, poetry, wall-painting, representations of gladiatorial combat, and romance novels, the contributors approach sexuality from both sides of the feminist pornography debate, including the use of film theory. A path-breaking application of feminist theory to the study of Greek and Roman cultures, this book offers new insight into the notion of sexuality in the ancient world.

Editorial Reviews

"Well-produced...the authors should be congratulated for tackling the issues rigorously and without straitjacketing their responses."--The Historian