Postcolonial Fiction and Disability: Exceptional Children, Metaphor and Materiality by C. BarkerPostcolonial Fiction and Disability: Exceptional Children, Metaphor and Materiality by C. Barker

Postcolonial Fiction and Disability: Exceptional Children, Metaphor and Materiality

byC. Barker

Hardcover | January 6, 2012

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This book is the first study of disability in postcolonial fiction. Focusing on canonical novels, it explores the metaphorical functions and material presence of disabled child characters. Barker argues that progressive disability politics emerge from postcolonial concerns, and establishes dialogues between postcolonialism and disability studies.

About The Author

CLARE BARKER Lecturer in English at the University of Birmingham, UK.

Details & Specs

Title:Postcolonial Fiction and Disability: Exceptional Children, Metaphor and MaterialityFormat:HardcoverDimensions:256 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.04 inPublished:January 6, 2012Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230307884

ISBN - 13:9780230307889

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
'Decrepit, Deranged, Deformed': Indigeneity and Cultural Health in Potiki
Hunger, Normalcy, and Postcolonial Disorder in Nervous Conditions and The Book of Not
Cracking India and Partition: Dismembering the National Body
The Nation as Freak Show: Monstrosity and Biopolitics in Midnight's Children
'Redreaming the World': Ontological Difference and Abiku Perception in The Famished Road
Conclusion: Growing Up
Bibliography
Index

Editorial Reviews

'Clare Barker's Exceptional Children is a very timely and distinctive book, which makes a strong ethical argument for a critical negotiation of postcolonial studies and disability studies through some illuminating readings of the figure of the child in postcolonial fiction.' - Stephen Morton, Senior Lecturer in English, University of Southampton.