Potboilers: Methods, Concepts and Case Studies in Popular Fiction by Mr Jerry PalmerPotboilers: Methods, Concepts and Case Studies in Popular Fiction by Mr Jerry Palmer

Potboilers: Methods, Concepts and Case Studies in Popular Fiction

byMr Jerry Palmer, Jerry PalmerEditorMr Jerry Palmer

Paperback | December 20, 1991

Pricing and Purchase Info

$59.49 online 
$61.50 list price
Earn 297 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Potboilerslooks at the many forms of popular narrative - in print, film and TV. It considers the ways in they have been analysed in literary criticism, sociology, communications, media and cultural studies.
The book introduces and summarizes two decades of debate about mass-produced fictions and their position within popular culture. It assesses the methods that have been used in these debates, focussing both on narrative analysis and the communications process. It explores generic conventions, the role of commercial strategies, and the nature of the audience with reference to crime fiction, soap opera, romance and TV sitcom.
Distinctions between `high' and `low' culture have relegated many popular forms to the trash-can of `great' literature. This book takes stock of the methods and concepts used to analyse popular culture and argues for a non-elitist approach to the study of literature, film and television.
Title:Potboilers: Methods, Concepts and Case Studies in Popular FictionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:228 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.6 inPublished:December 20, 1991Publisher:Routledge

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0415009782

ISBN - 13:9780415009782

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

..."readable, flowing book.... the theories discussed in depth in the first part, interesting enough in their own right, are concerned with traditional literary and filmic narratives. Most of the case studies in the second part, however, are taken from contemporary genres... two theoretical chapters... are highly relevant-- the one debating the relationship between popular culture and ideology... and the one concerned with definitions of genre.."-"Semiotica