Prayer in Greek Religion

Hardcover | August 1, 1997

bySimon Pulleyn

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In this, the first book-length study of Greek prayer to appear in English, Simon Pulleyn presents a comprehensive treatment of an aspect of religion which together with sacrifice was at the centre of Greek cult. Through a full examination of all the relevant literary and epigraphic materialavailable from the archaic and classical periods, Pulleyn seeks both to describe the ancient practices and explain their significance. Great stress is laid on the central role of reciprocity in Greek relations with the gods, and the various ways in which they addressed the gods are shown to berelated to strategies used in dealing with each other. The book also features an examination of the language used in prayer, e.g. formulae, and rhetorical structures, and draws on Indo-European comparative material.

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In this, the first book-length study of Greek prayer to appear in English, Simon Pulleyn presents a comprehensive treatment of an aspect of religion which together with sacrifice was at the centre of Greek cult. Through a full examination of all the relevant literary and epigraphic materialavailable from the archaic and classical peri...

Simon Pulleyn is at Merton College, Oxford.

other books by Simon Pulleyn

Homer: Iliad I
Homer: Iliad I

Paperback|Nov 15 2000

$82.61$82.95list price
Format:HardcoverDimensions:260 pages, 8.43 × 5.43 × 0.75 inPublished:August 1, 1997Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198150881

ISBN - 13:9780198150886

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`The book's value lies in its careful analysis of the various forms of prayer and its explication of how the principle of reciprocity applies in each ... An insightful work that can be appreciated by nonspecialists.'Bradley P. Nystrom, Religious Studies Review