Predestination, Policy and Polemic: Conflict and Consensus in the English Church from the Reformation to the Civil War by Peter WhitePredestination, Policy and Polemic: Conflict and Consensus in the English Church from the Reformation to the Civil War by Peter White

Predestination, Policy and Polemic: Conflict and Consensus in the English Church from the…

byPeter White

Paperback | April 18, 2002

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This important work refutes a currently fashionable consensus that maintains that the English Civil War can be seen as primarily the result of a Laudian and Arminian assault on a previously predominant Calvinism. According to this picture, the isolation of the court from Calvinist opinions, and the aggressive Arminian policies pursued during the reign of Charles I, ultimately drove previously law-abiding Calvinists into counter-resistance to the king and the church hierarchy. Arguing against sharp polarities, Peter White denies the existence of any sharply-defined "Calvinist consensus" into which "Arminianism" made deep and fateful inroads. The doctrinal evolution of the English Church is thus seen as a story to which theologians of contrasting churchmanship both contributed.
Title:Predestination, Policy and Polemic: Conflict and Consensus in the English Church from the…Format:PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.79 inPublished:April 18, 2002Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521892503

ISBN - 13:9780521892506

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Table of Contents

Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. The polemics of predestination: William Prynne and Peter Heylyn; 2. The theology of predestination: Beza and Arminius; 3. Early English Protestantism; 4. The Elizabethan church settlement; 5. Elizabeth's church: the limits of consensus; 6. The Cambridge controversies of the 1590s; 7. Richard Hooker; 8. The early Jacobean church; 9. The Synod of Dort; 10. Policy and polemic, 1619-1623; 11. A gag for the Gospel? Richard Montagu and Protestant orthodoxy; 12. Arminianism and the court, 1625-1629; 13. Thomas Jackson; 14. Neile and Laud on predestination; 15. The personal rule, 1629-1640; Select bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"This is a landmark study in industrial relations and will be required reading for anyone interested in the causes of strikes in modern industrial societies." Lowell J. Satre, The Historian